Isotopic and morphologic proxies for reconstructing light environment and leaf function of fossil leaves: a modern calibration in the Daintree Rainforest, Australia

Cheesman, Alexander W., Duff, Heather, Hill, Kathryn, Cernusak, Lucas A., and McInerney, Francesca A. (2020) Isotopic and morphologic proxies for reconstructing light environment and leaf function of fossil leaves: a modern calibration in the Daintree Rainforest, Australia. American Journal of Botany, 107 (8). pp. 1165-1176.

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Abstract

Premise: Within closed-canopy forests, vertical gradients of light and atmospheric CO(2)drive variations in leaf carbon isotope ratios, leaf mass per area (LMA), and the micromorphology of leaf epidermal cells. Variations in traits observed in preserved or fossilized leaves could enable inferences of past forest canopy closure and leaf function and thereby habitat of individual taxa. However, as yet no calibration study has examined how isotopic, micro- and macromorphological traits, in combination, reflect position within a modern closed-canopy forest or how these could be applied to the fossil record.

Methods: Leaves were sampled from throughout the vertical profile of the tropical forest canopy using the 48.5 m crane at the Daintree Rainforest Observatory, Queensland, Australia. Carbon isotope ratios, LMA, petiole metric (i.e., petiole-width(2)/leaf area, a proposed proxy for LMA that can be measured from fossil leaves), and leaf micromorphology (i.e., undulation index and cell area) were compared within species across a range of canopy positions, as quantified by leaf area index (LAI).

Results: Individually, cell area, delta C-13, and petiole metric all correlated with both LAI and LMA, but the use of a combined model provided significantly greater predictive power.

Conclusions: Using the observed relationships with leaf carbon isotope ratio and morphology to estimate the range of LAI in fossil floras can provide a measure of canopy closure in ancient forests. Similarly, estimates of LAI and LMA for individual taxa can provide comparative measures of light environment and growth strategy of fossil taxa from within a flora.

Item ID: 64373
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1537-2197
Keywords: cell area, forest canopy, fossil flora, leaf carbon isotope ratio, leaf mass per area, petiole metric, undulation index
Copyright Information: © 2020 Botanical Society of America
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC)
Projects and Grants: ARC FT110100793, ARC DP130104314, ARC DP120102965
Research Data: https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3ffbg79ff
Date Deposited: 16 Sep 2020 07:42
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0607 Plant Biology > 060705 Plant Physiology @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0603 Evolutionary Biology > 060306 Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change @ 20%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060203 Ecological Physiology @ 40%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960806 Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 100%
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