Injuries during transition periods across the year in pre-professional and professional ballet and contemporary dancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Fuller, M., Moyle, G.M., Hunt, A.P., and Minett, G.M. (2020) Injuries during transition periods across the year in pre-professional and professional ballet and contemporary dancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Physical Therapy in Sport, 44. pp. 14-23.

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Abstract

Objective: To consider the association of injuries with transition periods in the dance year, i.e., when dancers return at the start of the year, and when they transition from rehearsal to performance periods.

Methods: Six electronic databases were searched to November 2019. All English language peer-reviewed studies, of any study design investigating ballet and contemporary pre-professional and professional dance populations were included. Only those studies reporting on the timing of injury were included.

Results: Fifteen cohort and two case-series studies were included. A meta-analysis of seven studies revealed the rate of injuries to be significantly higher for the second and third months (1.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.11–2.08; 1.26; 95%CI:1.07–1.48 respectively) after the return to dance. Two further studies report more injuries up to Week 13 of the year. One study showed an increase in injured dancers at three and four weeks after transition from rehearsals to a performance season. Four studies show an increase in injuries at performance times.

Conclusions: Meta-analyses of seven studies shows the second and third months after returning to dance have a significantly higher rate of injuries. More research is needed to quantify training loads in dance. Practitioners should be cognisant of the higher injury rates during periods of transition and consider modifying load, as it is a potential contributing factor.

Item ID: 64267
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-1600
Keywords: Dance, Injury prevention, Risk factors, Training load
Copyright Information: Published Version: © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. Accepted Version: CC BY-NC-ND after 24 month embargo.
Date Deposited: 10 Sep 2020 03:33
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3202 Clinical sciences > 320225 Sports medicine @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services) @ 100%
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