Where is the trust? For the good of the people

Naylor, Stephen, and Harding, Sandra (2020) Where is the trust? For the good of the people. In: Pomeroy, Jason, (ed.) Cities of Opportunities: Connecting Culture and Innovation. Routledge, London, UK, pp. 7-22.

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Abstract

In an era where the public has greater access to information than ever before, why is it that social capital in many communities is so divided and diminished? Traditionally people have experienced and generated social capital through direct contact with families and social spaces, including neighbourhoods, communities, clubs and the workplace. Nowadays, many relationships and networks operate at a global level and in cyber-space – enabled through technology and screen-mediated interactions. While there are many benefits to contemporary technologies and innovations, including new forms of sociability, these same developments have also resulted in a loss of sociability; a loss of social capital, social cohesion and trust in institutions. Western democratic societies, including Australia, appear to have become open to the exploitation of change and uncertainty in communities, amplified by propagandists and the manipulation of both mainstream and social media; to sow social discord and create fear and uncertainty, including a loss of trust in scientific research originating from universities. It is the trust in knowledge and research that has guided many governments to look beyond political cycles and plan for inclusive, tolerant societies, receptive to population diversity creating unique social assets. It is in this context that the development of new forms of social spaces, including well-designed public buildings, prospectively hold the regeneration of social capital in pursuit of more economically successful and socially cohesive communities. Regional Australia, including the regional city of Townsville, is negotiating this shift.

Item ID: 63836
Item Type: Book Chapter (Research - B1)
ISBN: 9780367900663
Keywords: Urban Landscape Planning and Social Sustainability Urban Cultures Landscape and Sustainability City and Urban Planning Urban Design Cultural Geography
Copyright Information: © 2020 selection and editorial material, Department of Transport and Jason Pomeroy; individual essays, the contributors. In accordance with publisher policies, the Author Accepted Manuscript of this chapter will be available Open Access from ResearchOnline after 22 July 2021.
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2021 04:20
FoR Codes: 33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330405 Public participation and community engagement @ 40%
33 BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN > 3304 Urban and regional planning > 330406 Regional analysis and development @ 20%
44 HUMAN SOCIETY > 4410 Sociology > 441005 Social theory @ 40%
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