Non-prescription medicines may contribute to non-adherence to prescription medicines in people living with chronic health conditions

Anoopkumar-Dukiel, Shailendra, Mey, Amary, Hall, Susan, Bernaitis, Nijole, Davey, Andrew K., and Plummer, David (2020) Non-prescription medicines may contribute to non-adherence to prescription medicines in people living with chronic health conditions. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 74 (6). e13489.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.13489
 
1


Abstract

Background: Non-adherence to prescribed medicines is linked to adverse health outcomes in people living with chronic health conditions (CHCs). Multiple factors are known to contribute to non-adherence to medicines including polypharmacy, demographic features and disease and health systems. Both non-prescription and prescription medicines contribute to polypharmacy; however, there is limited data on the influence of non-prescription medicines to non-adherence.

Aim: Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate the influence of non-prescription medicines to non-adherence in an Australian population.

Methods: Data from the 2016 National Survey of a random sample of Australian adult residents were utilised in this study to investigate factors associated with non-adherence. Descriptive statistics, chi(2), regression and generalised linear models were used to assess the relationships between variables of interest. Narrative response and comments were used to provide further insight.

Results: This study recruited 1217 participants to explore factors associated with non-adherence to medicines. Weak but statistically significant correlations were identified showing the number of CHCs, patient's age, number of prescription medicines, number of non-prescription medicines and total number of medicines associated with non-adherence.

Discussion: The findings suggest that people living with CHCs and taking multiple medicines, including non-prescription medicines, are likely to be non-adherent to prescription medicines. This study shows the possible involvement of non-prescription medicines in contributing to non-adherence in an Australian population and suggests that future studies with a broader demographic are warranted.

Item ID: 63485
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1742-1241
Copyright Information: © 2020 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Funders: Griffith University
Date Deposited: 17 Jun 2020 07:38
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 1
Last 12 Months: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page