Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale infections and their association with common red blood cell polymorphisms in a highly endemic area of Uganda

Subissi, Lorenzo, Kanoi, Bernard N., Balikagala, Betty, Egwang, Thomas G., Oguike, Mary, Verra, Federica, Proietti, Carla, Bousema, Teun, Drakeley, Chris J., and Sepúlveda, Nuno (2019) Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium ovale infections and their association with common red blood cell polymorphisms in a highly endemic area of Uganda. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 113 (7). pp. 370-378.

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Abstract

Background: Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae infections are scarcely studied in sub-Saharan Africa, where the Plasmodium falciparum species predominates. The objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of P. ovale and P. malariae infections and their relationship with common red blood cell polymorphisms in a cohort of 509 individuals from Uganda.

Methods: Three cross-sectional surveys were conducted in individuals of 1–10 and >20 y of age from the Apac district at baseline and 6 and 16 weeks after drug treatment. Malaria infections were assessed by polymerase chain reaction and genotyping was performed for the sickle-cell allele, α-thalassaemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

Results: At baseline, the prevalence of infection was 7.5%, 12.6% and 57.4% for P. ovale, P. malariae and P. falciparum species, respectively. Co-infections were present in 14.1% of individuals, all including P. falciparum parasites. In children 1–5 y of age, the prevalence of P. ovale mono-infections increased significantly from 1.7% to 7.3% over time (p=0.004) while the prevalence of P. malariae and P. falciparum infections declined significantly during this study. After adjusting for confounding and multiple testing, only α-thalassaemia had a statistically significant increase in the odds of P. falciparum infections (odds ratio 1.93 [95% confidence interval 1.26 to 2.94]).

Conclusions: Common red blood cell polymorphisms do not show strong effects on mild Plasmodium infections in this Ugandan population. To understand the extent of this result, similar studies should be carried out in other populations using larger cohorts.

Item ID: 63044
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1878-3503
Keywords: ACT, co-infections, genetic association, non-falciparum
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Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved.For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com
Funders: Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union (SFP), Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia (FCT), Portugal
Projects and Grants: SFP FP7/2007/2013 PIAG-GA-2008-218164, FCT UID/MAT/00006/2013
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2020 02:43
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1108 Medical Microbiology > 110803 Medical Parasitology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases @ 100%
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