Prevalence and associations of General Practice registrars’ management of Impetigo: a cross-sectional analysis from the registrar clinical encounters in training (ReCEnT) study

Gorges, Hilary, Heal, Clare, van Driel, Mieke, Tapley, Amanda, Davis, Joshua, Holliday, Elizabeth, Ball, Jean, Najib, Nashwa, Spike, Neil, Fitzgerald, Kirsten, and Magin, Parker (2020) Prevalence and associations of General Practice registrars’ management of Impetigo: a cross-sectional analysis from the registrar clinical encounters in training (ReCEnT) study. Dermatology Practical & Conceptual, 10 (2). e2020043.

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Abstract

Background: Impetigo is a mild bacterial skin infection of childhood that is usually managed empirically in primary care. Objective: To establish the prevalence and associations of impetigo in general practice (GP) registrars’ consultations. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) study data. Results: Impetigo was managed in 0.24% of problems and 0.43% of consultations. Patient variables associated with impetigo presentations were younger age and impetigo as a new problem, while patients with non–English-speaking backgrounds were less likely to present with impetigo. Associated registrar variables were being new to the registrar and practicing in outer regional/remote locations. Compared with all other problems/diagnoses, impetigo more often involved information seeking, ordering pathology, and prescription of medication, but less often involved follow-up or referral. Conclusions: Impetigo accounts for 0.43 per 100 GP registrar consultations in Australia. Association with outer regional/remote areas may reflect climate and socioeconomic factors that predispose to impetigo. Associated pathology requests may reflect a lack of confidence in GP registrars’ management of impetigo. Cultural differences may exist regarding health-seeking behavior relating to impetigo.

Item ID: 63009
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2160-9381
Keywords: impetigo, prevalence, bacterial, primary care, skin infection
Copyright Information: ©2020 Gorges et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited
Funders: General Practice Training Valley to Coast, Victorian Metropolitan Alliance, General Practice Tasmania, Tropical Medicine Training, Adelaide to Outback GP Training Program, Commonwealth of Australia, GP Synergy
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2020 07:46
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111717 Primary Health Care @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920117 Skin and Related Disorders @ 100%
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