Is cost-related non-collection of ? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults

Jatrana, Santosh, Richardson, Ken, Norris, Pauline, and Crampton, Peter (2015) Is cost-related non-collection of ? Findings from a large-scale longitudinal study of New Zealand adults. BMJ Open, 5 (11). e007781.

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether cost-related noncollection of prescription medication is associated with a decline in health. Settings: New Zealand Survey of Family, Income and Employment (SoFIE)-Health.

Participants: Data from 17 363 participants with at least two observations in three waves (2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009) of a panel study were analysed using fixed effects regression modelling.

Primary outcome measures: Self-rated health (SRH), physical health (PCS) and mental health scores (MCS) were the health measures used in this study.

Results: After adjusting for time-varying confounders, non-collection of prescription items was associated with a 0.11 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.15) unit worsening in SRH, a 1.00 (95% CI 0.61 to 1.40) unit decline in PCS and a 1.69 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.18) unit decline in MCS. The interaction of the main exposure with gender was significant for SRH and MCS. Non-collection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.18 (95% CI 0.11 to 0.25) units for males and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.13) units for females, and a decrease in MCS of 2.55 (95% CI 1.67 to 3.42) and 1.29 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.89) units for males and females, respectively. The interaction of the main exposure with age was significant for SRH. For respondents aged 15-24 and 25-64 years, noncollection of prescription items was associated with a decline in SRH of 0.12 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.21) and 0.12 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.17) units, respectively, but for respondents aged 65 years and over, non-collection of prescription items had no significant effect on SRH.

Conclusion: Our results show that those who do not collect prescription medications because of cost have an increased risk of a subsequent decline in health.

Item ID: 62586
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2044-6055
Copyright Information: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Date Deposited: 06 Dec 2021 01:07
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4203 Health services and systems > 420319 Primary health care @ 60%
42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4202 Epidemiology > 420210 Social epidemiology @ 40%
SEO Codes: 28 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 2801 Expanding knowledge > 280112 Expanding knowledge in the health sciences @ 50%
20 HEALTH > 2004 Public health (excl. specific population health) > 200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing) @ 50%
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