Validity and intra-rater reliability of MyJump app on iPhone 6s in jump performance

Stanton, Robert, Wintour, Sally-Anne, and Kean, Crystal O. (2017) Validity and intra-rater reliability of MyJump app on iPhone 6s in jump performance. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20 (5). pp. 518-523.

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Abstract

Objectives: Smartphone applications are increasingly used by researchers, coaches, athletes and clinicians. The aim of this study was to examine the concurrent validity and intra-rater reliability of the smartphone-based application, MyJump, against laboratory-based force plate measurements.

Design: Cross sectional study.

Methods: Participants completed counter-movement jumps (CMJ) (n = 29) and 30 cm drop jumps (DJ) (n = 27) on a force plate which were simultaneously recorded using MyJump. To assess concurrent validity, jump height, derived from flight time acquired from each device, was compared for each jump type. Intra-rater reliability was determined by replicating data analysis of MyJump recordings on two occasions separated by seven days.

Results: CMJ and DJ heights derived from MyJump showed excellent agreement with the force plate (ICC values range from 0.991 for CMJ to 0.993) However mean DJ height from the force plate was significantly higher than MyJump (mean difference: 0.87 cm, 95% CI: 0.69–1.04 cm). Intra-rater reliability of MyJump for both CMJ and DJ was almost perfect (ICC values range from 0.997 for CMJ to 0.998 for DJ); however, mean CMJ and DJ jump height for Day 1 was significantly higher than Day 2 (CMJ: 0.43 cm, 95% CI: 0.23–0.62 cm); (DJ: 0.38 cm, 95% CI: 0.23–0.53 cm).

Conclusion: The present study finds MyJump to be a valid and highly reliable tool for researchers, coaches, athletes and clinicians; however, systematic bias should be considered when comparing MyJump outputs to other testing devices.

Item ID: 62143
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1878-1861
Keywords: jump height, muscle power, physical performance, skill development, strength
Copyright Information: © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia.
Funders: Central Queensland University
Projects and Grants: CQUniversity Summer Scolarship
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2020 19:35
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology @ 50%
08 INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES > 0805 Distributed Computing > 080502 Mobile Technologies @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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