Australian and New Zealand veterinary students' opinions on animal welfare and ethical issues concerning animal use within sport, recreation, and display

Fawcett, Anne, Hazel, Susan, Collins, Teresa, Degeling, Christopher, Fisher, Andrew, Freire, Rafael, Hood, Jennifer, Johnson, Jane, Lloyd, Janice, Phillips, Clive, Stafford, Kevin, Tzioumis, Vicky, and Mcgreevy, Paul (2019) Australian and New Zealand veterinary students' opinions on animal welfare and ethical issues concerning animal use within sport, recreation, and display. Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 46 (2). pp. 264-272.

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Abstract

Animals used for sport, recreation and display are highly visible and can divide community attitudes.The study of animal welfare and ethics (AWE) as part of veterinary education is important because it is the responsibility of veterinarians to use their scientific knowledge and skills to promote animal welfare in the context of community expectations.To explore the attitudes of veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand to AWE, a survey of the current cohort was undertaken.The survey aimed to reveal how veterinary students in Australia and New Zealand rate the importance of five selected AWE topics for Day One Competences in animals used in sport, recreation and display and to establish how veterinary students' priorities were associated with gender and stage of study.The response rate (n = 851) across the seven schools was just over 25%. Results indicated little variation on ratings for topics. The topics were ranked in the following order (most to least important): Pushing of animals to their physiologic/behavioral limits; ownership/responsibility; euthanasia; educating the public; and behavior, selection, and training for sport and recreation displays. In contrast to related studies, ratings were not associated with stage of study and there were few differences associated with gender. More females rated the pushing of animals to physiologic/ behavioral limits as extremely important than did males (p < .001).The role of veterinarians in advocating for and educating the public about the welfare of animals used in sport, recreation and display merits further discussion.

Item ID: 62071
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1943-7218
Keywords: Animal welfare, Curriculum, Ethics, Performance animals, Veterinary science
Copyright Information: © 2019 AAVMC.
Date Deposited: 28 Apr 2020 21:39
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070799 Veterinary Sciences not elsewhere classified @ 50%
13 EDUCATION > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130299 Curriculum and Pedagogy not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8399 Other Animal Production and Animal Primary Products > 839901 Animal Welfare @ 70%
92 HEALTH > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified @ 10%
93 EDUCATION AND TRAINING > 9303 Curriculum > 930302 Syllabus and Curriculum Development @ 20%
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