Post-activation potentiation effect of eccentric overload and traditional weightlifting exercise on jumping and sprinting performance in male athletes

Beato, Marco, Bigby, Alexander E.J., De Keijzer, Kevin L., Nakamura, Fabio Y., Coratella, Giuseppe, and McErlain-Naylor, Stuart A. (2019) Post-activation potentiation effect of eccentric overload and traditional weightlifting exercise on jumping and sprinting performance in male athletes. PLoS ONE, 14 (9). e0222466.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the post-activation potentiation (PAP) effects following eccentric overload (EOL) and traditional weightlifting (TW) exercise on standing long jump (SLJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and 5 m sprint acceleration performance. Ten male athletes were involved in a randomized, crossover study. The subjects performed 3 sets of 6 repetitions of EOL or TW half squat exercise followed by SLJ, CMJ, and 5 m sprint tests at 1 min, 3 min and 7 min, in separate sessions using a randomized order. Bayes factor (BF₁₀) was reported to show the strength of the evidence. Differences were found using EOL for SLJ distance at 3 min (BF₁₀ = 7.24, +8%), and 7 min (BF₁₀ = 19.5, +7%), for CMJ at 3 min (BF₁₀ = 3.25, +9%), and 7 min (BF₁₀ = 4.12, +10.5%). Differences were found using TW exercise for SLJ at 3 min (BF₁₀ = 3.88, +9%), and 7 min (BF₁₀ = 12.4, +9%), CMJ at 3 min (BF₁₀ = 7.42, +9.5%), and 7 min (BF₁₀ = 12.4, +12%). No meaningful differences were found between EOL and TW exercises for SLJ (BF₁₀ = 0.33), CMJ (BF₁₀ = 0.27), and 5 m sprint (BF₁₀ = 0.22). In conclusion, EOL and TW exercises acutely increase SLJ and CMJ, but not 5 m sprint performance. The PAP time window was found between 3 min and 7 min using both protocols. This study did not find differences between EOL and TW exercises, and so both methodologies can be used to stimulate a PAP response.

Item ID: 62015
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1932-6203
Copyright Information: © 2019 Beato et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Date Deposited: 25 May 2020 05:23
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110601 Biomechanics @ 50%
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