"I think they believe in me": the predictive effects of teammate- and classmate-focused relation-inferred self-efficacy in sport and physical activity settings

Jackson, Ben, Gucciardi, Daniel F., Lonsdale, Chris, Whipp, Peter R., and Dimmock, James A. (2014) "I think they believe in me": the predictive effects of teammate- and classmate-focused relation-inferred self-efficacy in sport and physical activity settings. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 36 (5). pp. 486-505.

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Abstract

Despite the prevalence of group-/team-based enactment within sport and physical activity settings, to this point the study of relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) has been focused upon estimations regarding a single target individual (e.g., one's coach). Accordingly, researchers have not yet considered whether individuals may also form RISE estimations regarding the extent to which the others in their group/team as a whole are confident in their ability. We applied structural equation modeling analyses with cross-sectional and prospective data collected from members of interdependent sport teams (Studies 1 and 2) and undergraduate physical activity classes (Studies 3 and 4), with the purpose of exploring these group-focused RISE inferences. Analyses showed that group-focused RISE perceptions (a) predicted individuals' confidence in their own ability, (b) were empirically distinct from conceptually related constructs, and (c) directly and/or indirectly predicted a range of downstream outcomes over and above the effects of other efficacy perceptions. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary evidence that individuals' group-focused RISE appraisals may be important to consider when investigating the network of efficacy perceptions that develops in group-based physical activity contexts.

Item ID: 61590
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1543-2904
Keywords: intentions, participation, relational efficacy, RISE, tripartite efficacy
Copyright Information: © 2014 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Funders: Australian Research Council
Projects and Grants: DE120101006
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2020 22:38
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health @ 100%
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