Attraction versus capture: efficiency of BG-Sentinel trap under semi-field conditions and characterizing response behaviors for female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae)

Amos, Brogan A., Staunton, Kyran M., Ritchie, Scott A., and Cardé, Ring T. (2020) Attraction versus capture: efficiency of BG-Sentinel trap under semi-field conditions and characterizing response behaviors for female Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Journal of Medical Entomology, 57 (3). pp. 884-892.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjz243
 
3


Abstract

Aedes aegypti (L.) is an important vector of viruses causing dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever and as such is a threat to public health worldwide. Effective trapping methods are essential for surveillance of both the mosquito species and disease presence. The BG-Sentinel (BGS) is a widely used to trap Ae. aegypti but little is known of its efficiency, i.e., what proportion of the mosquitoes encountering the trap are captured. The first version of the BGS trap was predominantly white, and the current version is mostly navy blue. While this trap is often deployed without any olfactory lure, it can also be deployed with CO2 and/or a human skin odor mimic lure to increase capture rates. We tested the efficiency of capturing Ae. aegypti under semi-field conditions for the original white version without lures as well the blue version with and without various lure combinations. None of the configurations tested here captured 100% of the mosquitoes that encountered the trap. A navyblue trap emitting CO2 and a skin odor mimic produced the highest capture (14% of the total insects in the semi-field cage), but its capture efficiency was just 5% (of mosquitoes encountering the trap). Mosquitoes often had multiple encounters with a trap that did not result in capture; they crossed over the trap entrance without being captured or landed on the sides of the trap. Understanding these behaviors and the factors that induce them has the potential to suggest improvement in trap design and therefore capture efficiency.

Item ID: 61460
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 0022-2585
Keywords: Aedes aegypti; Biogents Sentinel trap; mosquito; dengue; Zika
Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. 884 All rights reserved.
Funders: Pacific Southwest Regional Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Diseases
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2020 12:56
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 3
Last 12 Months: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page