Geographic and taxonomic patterns of extinction risk in Australian squamates

Tingley, Reid, Macdonald, Stewart, Mitchell, Nicola J., Woinarski, John C. Z., Meiri, Shai, Bowles, Phil, Cox, Neil A., Shea, Glenn M., Bohm, Monika, Chanson, Janice, Tognelli, Marcelo, Harris, Jaclyn, Walke, Claire, Harrison, Natasha, Victor, Savannah, Woods, Calum, Amey, Andrew P., Bamford, Mike, Catt, Gareth, Clemann, Nick, Couper, Patrick, Cogger, Hal, Cowan, Mark, Craig, Michael D., Dickman, Chris R., Doughty, Paul, Ellis, Ryan, Fenner, Aaron, Ford, Stewart, Gaikhorst, Glen, Gillespie, Graeme, Greenlees, Matthew J., Hobson, Rod, Hoskin, Conrad J., How, Ric, Hutchinson, Michael N., Lloyd, Ray, McDonald, Peter, Melville, Jane, Michael, Damian R., Moritz, Craig, Oliver, Paul M., Peterson, Garry, Robertson, Peter, Sanderson, Chris, Somaweera, Ruchira, Teale, Roy, Valentine, Leonie, Vanderduys, Eric, Venz, Melanie, Wapstra, Erik, Wilson, Steve, and Chapple, David (2019) Geographic and taxonomic patterns of extinction risk in Australian squamates. Biological Conservation, 238. 108203.

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Abstract

Australia is a global hotspot of reptile diversity, hosting similar to 10% of the world's squamate (snake and lizard) species. Yet the conservation status of the Australian squamate fauna has not been assessed for >25 years; a period during which the described fauna has risen by similar to 40%. Here we provide the first comprehensive conservation assessment of Australian terrestrial squamates using IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria. Most (86.4%; n = 819/948) Australian squamates were categorised as Least Concern, 4.5% were Data Deficient, and 7.1% (range 6.8%-11.3%, depending on the treatment of Data Deficient species) were threatened (3.0% Vulnerable, 2.7% Endangered, 1.1% Critically Endangered). This level of threat is low relative to the global average (similar to 18%). One species (Emoia nativitatis) was assessed as Extinct, and two species (Lepidodactylus listeri and Cryptoblepharus egeriae) are considered Extinct in the Wild: all three were endemic to Christmas Island. Most (75.1%) threat assessments were based on geographic range attributes, due to limited data on population trends or relevant proxies. Agriculture, fire, and invasive species were the threats that affected the most species, and there was substantial geographic variation in the number of species affected by each threat. Threatened species richness peaked on islands, in the Southern Alps, and across northern Australia. Data deficiency was greatest in northern Australia and in coastal Queensland. Approximately one-in-five threatened species were not represented in a single protected area. Our analyses shed light on the species, regions, and threats in most urgent need of conservation intervention.

Item ID: 61211
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-2917
Keywords: Assessment, Conservation status, Extinction risk, IUCN, Reptiles, Threat status
Copyright Information: © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Funders: Toyota, Conservation International (CI), Environment Abu Dhabi, Monash University (MU), University of Western Australia (UWA), Department of the Environment and Energy
Date Deposited: 18 Dec 2019 07:35
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 100%
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