Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Middle Fly District of Western Province, Papua New Guinea: microbead-based spoligotyping using DNA from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopy preparations

Guernier-Cambert, Vanina, Diefenbach-Elstob, Tanya, Klotoe, Bernice J., Burgess, Graham, Pelowa, Daniel, Dowi, Robert, Gula, Bisato, McBryde, Emma S., Refrégier, Guislaine, Rush, Catherine, Sola, Christophe, and Warner, Jeffrey (2019) Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Middle Fly District of Western Province, Papua New Guinea: microbead-based spoligotyping using DNA from Ziehl-Neelsen-stained microscopy preparations. Scientific Reports, 9. 15549.

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Abstract

Tuberculosis remains the world’s leading cause of death from an infectious agent, and is a serious health problem in Papua New Guinea (PNG) with an estimated 36,000 new cases each year. This study describes the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among tuberculosis patients in the Balimo/Bamu region in the Middle Fly District of Western Province in PNG, and investigates rifampicin resistance-associated mutations. Archived Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sputum smears were used to conduct microbead-based spoligotyping and assess genotypic resistance. Among the 162 samples included, 80 (49.4%) generated spoligotyping patterns (n = 23), belonging predominantly to the L2 Lineage (44%) and the L4 Lineage (30%). This is consistent with what has been found in other PNG regions geographically distant from Middle Fly District of Western Province, but is different from neighbouring South-East Asian countries. Rifampicin resistance was identified in 7.8% of the successfully sequenced samples, with all resistant samples belonging to the L2/Beijing Lineage. A high prevalence of mixed L2/L4 profiles was suggestive of polyclonal infection in the region, although this would need to be confirmed. The method described here could be a game-changer in resource-limited countries where large numbers of archived smear slides could be used for retrospective (and prospective) studies of M. tuberculosis genetic epidemiology.

Item ID: 60991
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Funders: Queensland Government Department of Science, Information, Technology and Innovation (DSITI), Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine (AITHM)
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2019 00:34
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1108 Medical Microbiology > 110801 Medical Bacteriology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases @ 100%
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