Does access to saltwater swimming pools reduce ear pathology and hearing loss in school children of remote arid zone aboriginal communities? A prospective 3-year cohort study

Sanchez, Linnett, Carney, Andrew Simon, Esterman, Adrian, Sparrow, Karen, and Turner, David (2019) Does access to saltwater swimming pools reduce ear pathology and hearing loss in school children of remote arid zone aboriginal communities? A prospective 3-year cohort study. Clinical Otolaryngology, 44 (5). pp. 736-742.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1111/coa.13364
 
1


Abstract

Objective: To assess whether access to saltwater chlorinated swimming pools in remote Aboriginal communities is beneficial in reducing levels of middle ear disease and hearing loss in school children.

Design: A prospective 3‐year cohort study of children in 10 remote Aboriginal communities in South Australia with (n = 4) or without (n = 6) swimming pools.

Setting: Outback Australia.

Participants: Eight hundred and thirteen school‐age children residing in remote South Australia.

Main outcome measures: Prevalence of open and closed middle ear disease and prevalence of hearing loss.

Results: About 2107 ear assessments were conducted during the study period. 70.7% of children in communities with pools failed a screening test of hearing compared with 68.6% of children in non‐pool communities (P = 0.637). 32.3% of children had chronic otitis media (COM). There was no difference between pool and non‐pool communities in the frequency of either inactive (19.4% pool vs 22.6% non‐pool; P = 0.232) or active (19.8% pool vs 17.8% non‐pool; P = 0.383) COM. In children with bilateral intact tympanic membranes, 21.2% had unilateral and 20.6 had bilateral type B tympanograms. There was no difference between pool and non‐pool communities in the frequency of type B tympanometry (P = 0.465).

Conclusions: Hearing loss associated with both open and closed middle ear disease remains highly prevalent in children living in remote Aboriginal communities in South Australia. Access to swimming pools in this population does not appear to significantly reduce these high levels of middle ear disease or associated hearing loss.

Item ID: 60403
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1749-4486
Keywords: acoustic impedance tests, audiology, oceanic ancestry group, otitis media, otitis media with effusion, otoscopy, speech-language pathology, suppurative
Copyright Information: © 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Funders: Department of Health and Ageing, Australian Government
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2019 07:39
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page