Trap location and premises condition influences on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) catches using Biogents Sentinel traps during a ‘rear and release’ program: implications for designing surveillance programs

Staunton, Kyran M., Yeeles, Peter, Townsend, Michael, Nowrouzi, Somayeh, Paton, Christopher J., Trewin, Brendan, Pagendam, Daniel, Bondarenco, Artiom, Devine, Gregor J., Snoad, Nigel, Beebe, Nigel W., and Ritchie, Scott A. (2019) Trap location and premises condition influences on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) catches using Biogents Sentinel traps during a ‘rear and release’ program: implications for designing surveillance programs. Journal of Medical Entomology, 56 (4). pp. 1102-1111.

[img] PDF - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjz018
 
1


Abstract

As the incidence of arboviral diseases such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya, and yellow fever increases globally, controlling their primary vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), is of greater importance than ever before. Mosquito control programs rely heavily on effective adult surveillance to ensure methodological efficacy. The Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap is the gold standard for surveilling adult Aedes mosquitoes and is commonly deployed worldwide, including during modern ‘rear and release’ programs. Despite its extensive use, few studies have directly assessed environmental characteristics that affect BGS trap catches, let alone how these influences change during ‘rear and release’ programs. We assessed male and female Ae. aegypti spatial stability, as well as premises condition and trap location influences on BGS trap catches, as part of Debug Innisfail ‘rear and release’ program in northern Australia. We found similar trends in spatial stability of male and female mosquitoes at both weekly and monthly resolutions. From surveillance in locations where no males were released, reduced catches were found at premises that contained somewhat damaged houses and unscreened properties. In addition, when traps were located in areas that were unsheltered, more than 10 m from commonly used sitting areas or more visually complex catches were also negatively affected. In locations where males were released, we found that traps in treatment sites, relative to control sites, displayed increased catches in heavily shaded premises and were inconsistently influenced by differences in house sets and building materials. Such findings have valuable implications for a range of Ae. aegypti surveillance programs.

Item ID: 59782
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1938-2928
Keywords: Aedes aegypti, Biogents Sentinel trap, sterile insect release, Wolbachia, dengue, Zika
Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved.
Date Deposited: 14 Aug 2019 03:01
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 1
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page