Australian women’s self-perceived barriers to participation in cervical cancer screening: a systematic review

Nagendiram, Archana, Bougher, Hannah, Banks, Jennifer, Hall, Leanne, and Heal, Clare (2019) Australian women’s self-perceived barriers to participation in cervical cancer screening: a systematic review. Health Promotion Journal of Australia. (In Press)

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View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1002/hpja.280
 
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Abstract

Background: Australia has recently introduced a new screening program for cervical cancer. There has also been a decline in participation rates for cervical screening. Aim: To complete a systematic literature review of the factors that prevent Australian women from participating in cervical screening. Methods: Authors searched CINAHL, Medline, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library to obtain articles discussing Australian women’s self-identified barriers to cervical screening. Quantitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals after 1991 were considered. PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42018105028. Results: The final search produced 1749 studies with 13 quantitative papers included in the narrative synthesis after screening by two independent reviewers. No articles were excluded due to bias. Discussion: Self-identified barriers to screening were categorised into personal, practitioner, test-related and logistical factors. The most commonly stated barriers included lack of time, embarrassment, fear of results, irrelevance and male health professionals. The use of HPV triage in cervical screening was not a barrier to screening however, some women regarded self-collected HPV testing as a barrier. Barriers to self-collection included desire for the general practitioner to complete the test, fear of doing the test incorrectly, wishing to include it in a general check-up and concerns about the test itself. Conclusion: A variety of personal, practitioner, test-related and logistical barriers negatively impact the screening participation of Australian women. Further research into barriers in the Australian population, and women’s attitudes towards HPV testing and self-collection is required to create effective health interventions to improve participation in cervical screening.

Item ID: 59015
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1036-1073
Keywords: Australia; barriers; cervical screening; human papillomavirus; National Cervical Screening Program; pap test
Copyright Information: © 2019 Australian Health Promotion Association.
Date Deposited: 23 Aug 2019 05:20
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111717 Primary Health Care @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920507 Womens Health @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920412 Preventive Medicine @ 50%
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