Melanopsin-mediated pupil function is impaired in Parkinson’s disease

Joyce, Daniel S., Feigl, Beatrix, Kerr, Graham K., Roeder, Luisa, and Zele, Andrew J. (2018) Melanopsin-mediated pupil function is impaired in Parkinson’s disease. Scientific Reports, 8. 7796.

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Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterised by non-motor symptoms including sleep and circadian disruption. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells (ipRGC) transmit light signals to brain areas controlling circadian rhythms and the pupil light reflex. To determine if non-motor symptoms observed in PD are linked to ipRGC dysfunction, we evaluated melanopsin and rod/cone contributions to the pupil response in medicated participants with PD (n = 17) and controls (n = 12). Autonomic tone was evaluated by measuring pupillary unrest in darkness. In the PD group, there is evidence for an attenuated post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) amplitude and reduced pupil constriction amplitude, and PIPR amplitudes did not correlate with measures of sleep quality, retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, disease severity, or medication dosage. Both groups exhibited similar pupillary unrest. We show that melanopsin- and the rod/cone-photoreceptor contributions to the pupil control pathway are impaired in people with early-stage PD who have no clinically observable ophthalmic abnormalities. Given that ipRGCs project to brain targets involved in arousal, sleep and circadian rhythms, ipRGC dysfunction may underpin some of the non-motor symptoms observed in PD.

Item ID: 58878
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Copyright Information: © The Author(s) 2018. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Cre-ative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC), Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI)
Projects and Grants: ARC Discovery Project ARC-DP170100274, IHBI Vision and Eye Program Grant
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2019 23:30
FoR Codes: 32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3212 Ophthalmology and optometry > 321204 Vision science @ 34%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3209 Neurosciences > 320905 Neurology and neuromuscular diseases @ 33%
32 BIOMEDICAL AND CLINICAL SCIENCES > 3209 Neurosciences > 320907 Sensory systems @ 33%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920112 Neurodegenerative Disorders Related to Ageing @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920599 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) not elsewhere classified @ 50%
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