Associations between cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge, self-efficacy, training history and willingness to perform CPR and CPR psychomotor skills: a systematic review

Riggs, Matthew, Franklin, Richard, and Saylany, Lua (2019) Associations between cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge, self-efficacy, training history and willingness to perform CPR and CPR psychomotor skills: a systematic review. Resuscitation, 138. pp. 259-272.

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Abstract

Aim: To determine whether training history (including number of times and duration since last training), knowledge, self-efficacy or willingness are associated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) psychomotor skills.

Methods: Eight databases were systematically searched from January 2005 to February 2018 for articles that involved adult layperson participants and explored an association between training history, knowledge, self-efficacy or willingness and CPR psychomotor skills or survival outcomes after real CPR attempts.

Results: Thirty-four articles with a total of 35,421 participants were included. CPR training was found to improve psychomotor skills, compared to no training, and any previous training was associated with better skills, compared to no previous training, however only the use of a popular song promoted meaningful retention of a specifically targeted skill, compared to standard training methods. Skills deteriorated within 3 months, then plateaued from 3 to 6 months. Self-efficacy was weakly associated with skill level, however knowledge was not associated with skill level. No studies assessed the association between willingness and psychomotor skills.

Conclusion: All laypeople should attend an instructor-led CPR training session with real-time or delayed feedback to improve CPR skills. Training sessions should utilise combinations of validated skill-specific training strategies, preferably including popular songs and feedback to help ensure skills retention. Refresher training, which focusses on skills and self-confidence rather than knowledge, should be undertaken every 3-6 months, although this timeframe needs further validation. All future studies assessing CPR psychomotor skills should adhere to a standardised reporting outcome list (proposed in this paper) to ensure consistency and comparability of results.

Item ID: 58429
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-1570
Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR, psychomotor skills, training, education, retention, self-efficacy, knowledge, willingness, survival
Copyright Information: © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Funders: James Cook University
Date Deposited: 29 May 2019 07:48
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920407 Health Protection and/or Disaster Response @ 100%
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