Predicting household water consumption with individual-level variables

Jorgensen, Bradley S., Martin, John F., Pearce, Meryl W., and Willis, Eileen M. (2014) Predicting household water consumption with individual-level variables. Environment and Behaviour, 46 (7). pp. 872-897.

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Abstract

Few studies investigating the psychological determinants of water consumption and conservation use metered household water data. Studies that have used metered consumption have found that individual-level motivations are often weak predictors. This may be due to the psychological determinants being measured at the individual level and metered consumption at the household level. This article contributes to the water consumption literature by (a) identifying the determinants of change in water consumption over time and (b) testing effects in single-person households where levels of analysis are equivalent. We applied models to data from South Australia (N = 410) and Victoria (N = 205) and found that variables at the individual, household, dwelling, and regional levels predict the initial level of consumption and/or its rate of change. Some individual-level variables were not significant predictors of household consumption but did predict individual consumption. We discuss these results in light of previous research and offer avenues for future research.

Item ID: 58030
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1552-390X
Keywords: attitudes, intentions, water conservation, consumption
Copyright Information: © 2013 SAGE Publications
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC), South Australia Water, Coliban Water
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2019 09:15
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050205 Environmental Management @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9607 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards > 960702 Consumption Patterns, Population Issues and the Environment @ 100%
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