Additional early active repetitive motor training did not prevent contracture in adults receiving task-specific upper limb training after stroke: a randomised trial

Horsley, Sally, Lannin, Natasha A., Hayward, Kathryn S., and Herbert, Robert D. (2019) Additional early active repetitive motor training did not prevent contracture in adults receiving task-specific upper limb training after stroke: a randomised trial. Journal of Physiotherapy, 65 (2). pp. 88-94.

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Abstract

Question: In adults undergoing rehabilitation after stroke, does 1 hour of additional active repetitive reaching per day prevent or reduce upper limb contracture? Design: Multi-centre, randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding, and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Fifty adults undergoing rehabilitation after stroke who were unable to actively extend the affected wrist past neutral or were unable to flex the affected shoulder to 90 deg. Setting: Three inpatient rehabilitation units in Australia.

Intervention: Both groups received usual upper limb therapy 5 days a week for 5 weeks. In addition, the experimental group received up to 1 hour a day of active, intensive, repetitive upper limb training using the SMART Arm device 5 days a week for 5 weeks. Outcome measures: Measures were collected at baseline (Week 0), after intervention (Week 5) and at follow-up (Week 7). The primary outcomes were passive range of wrist extension, elbow extension, and shoulder flexion at Week 5. The secondary outcomes were: the three primary outcomes measured at Week 7; passive range of shoulder external rotation; arm function; and pain at rest, on movement and during sleep measured at Weeks 5 and 7. Results: Following an average of 2310 reaching repetitions, the mean effect at Week 5 on passive range of wrist extension was 1 deg (95% CI -6 to 8), elbow extension -6 deg (95% CI -12 to -1), and shoulder flexion 5 deg (95% CI -8 to 17). There were no statistically significant or clinically important effects of the intervention on any secondary outcomes.

Conclusion: In adults who are already receiving task-specific motor training for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke, 5 weeks of up to 1 hour of additional daily active repetitive motor training using the SMART Arm device did not prevent or reduce contracture in upper limb muscles.

Item ID: 58022
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1836-9561
Keywords: randomised controlled trial, stroke, contracture, upper extremity, active motor training
Copyright Information: © 2019 Australian Physiotherapy Association.
Funders: Sunshine Coast Health Foundation (SCHF), National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: SCHF Wishlist Research Grant Scheme, NHMRC GNT1088449 & RG153190
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2019 09:11
FoR Codes: 42 HEALTH SCIENCES > 4201 Allied health and rehabilitation science > 420106 Physiotherapy @ 100%
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