Higher circulating androgens and higher physical activity levels are associated with less central adiposity and lower risk of cardiovascular death in older men

Chasland, Lauren C., Knuiman, Matthew W., Divitini, Mark L., Murray, Kevin, Handelsman, David J., Flicker, Leon, Hankey, Graeme J., Almeida, Osvaldo P., Golledge, Jonathan, Ridgers, Nicola D., Naylor, Louise H., Green, Daniel J., and Yeap, Bu B. (2019) Higher circulating androgens and higher physical activity levels are associated with less central adiposity and lower risk of cardiovascular death in older men. Clinical Endocrinology, 90 (2). pp. 375-383.

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Abstract

Objective: Low endogenous sex hormones and low physical activity (PA) levels have been associated with CVD risk. Whether these interact to influence CVD outcomes remains unclear. We assessed whether sex hormone concentrations and PA were additively associated with lower central adiposity and CVD risk.

Patients: 3351 community‐dwelling men, mean age 77 years.

Measurements: Baseline testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and oestradiol (E2) were assayed. Levels of PA were ascertained by questionnaire. Men were stratified using median splits into high hormone + high PA (H/H), high hormone + low PA (H/L); low hormone + high PA (L/H) and low hormone + low PA (L/L) groups.

Results: A total of 865 CVD events and 499 CVD deaths occurred during 10‐year mean follow‐up. Men with higher T, DHT or SHBG and higher PA had the lowest BMI, waist circumference and risk of metabolic syndrome. Men with higher T had the lowest risk of incident CVD events, irrespective of PA level. Men with higher T or DHT and higher PA had the lowest risk of dying from CVD (eg, hazard ratios for T/PA H/H 0.76 P = 0.031; H/L 0.85 P = 0.222; L/H 0.80 P = 0.075; L/L 1.00).

Conclusion: Higher circulating androgens and higher PA were associated with less central adiposity at baseline and fewer CVD deaths during follow‐up. These findings are consistent with a potential additive effect of androgens and PA on cardiometabolic outcomes in older men.

Item ID: 57016
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1365-2265
Keywords: cardiovascular disease, dihydrotestosterone, metabolic syndrome, physical activity, testosterone
Copyright Information: © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Sylvia and Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation (SCVCF)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC Grant No. APP1080914, NHMRC Grant No. 1117061, NHMRC Grant No. 279408, NHMRC Grant No. 379600, NHMRC Grant No. 403963, NHMRC Grant No. 513823, NHMRC Grant No. 634492, NHMRC Grant No. 1045710, NHMRC Grant No. 1060557, NHMRC Grant No. 1121548, SCVCF Clinical Investigator Award
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2019 07:31
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology > 110299 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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