New prototype screened doors and windows for excluding mosquitoes from houses: a pilot study in rural Gambia

Jawara, Musa, Jatta, Ebrima, Bell, David, Burkot, Thomas R., Bradley, John, Hunt, Victoria, Kandeh, Balla, Jones, Caroline, Manjang, Aji Matty, Pinder, Margaret, Stone, Shannon, D'Alessandro, Umberto, Knudsen, Jakob, and Lindsay, Steve W. (2018) New prototype screened doors and windows for excluding mosquitoes from houses: a pilot study in rural Gambia. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 99 (6). pp. 1475-1484.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (1MB) | Preview
View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.18-0660
 
10


Abstract

Despite compelling evidence that modern housing protects against malaria, houses in endemic areas are still commonly porous to mosquitoes. The protective efficacy of four prototype screened doors and two windows designs against mosquito house entry, their impact on indoor climate, as well as their use, durability and acceptability was assessed in a Gambian village. A baseline survey collected data on all the houses and discrete household units, each consisting of a front and back room, were selected and randomly allocated to the study arms. Each prototype self-closing screened door and window was installed in six and 12 units, respectively, with six unaltered units serving as controls. All prototype doors reduced the number of house-entering mosquitoes by 59-77% in comparison with the control houses. The indoor climate of houses with screened doors was similar to control houses. Seventy-nine percentage of door openings at night occurred from dusk to midnight, when malaria vectors begin entering houses. Ten weeks after installation the doors and windows were in good condition, although 38% of doors did not fully self-close and latch ( snap shut). The new doors and windows were popular with residents. The prototype door with perforated concertinaed screening was the best performing door because it reduced mosquito entry, remained fully functional, and was preferred by the villagers. Screened doors and windows may be useful tools for reducing vector exposure and keeping areas malaria-free after elimination, when investment in routine vector control becomes difficult to maintain.

Item ID: 56727
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1476-1645
Copyright Information: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Funders: Global Good Fund, Global Challenges Research Fund for Networks in Vector Borne Disease Research, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Medical Research Council (MRC), National Environmental Research Council (NERC), Wellcome Trust, Sir Halley Stewart Trust
Date Deposited: 26 Dec 2018 07:35
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 10
Last 12 Months: 10
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page