Fatty acid profiles of muscle, liver, heart and kidney of Australian prime lambs fed different polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched pellets in a feedlot system

Le, Hung Van, Nguyen, Don Viet, Nguyen, Quang Vu, Malau-Aduli, Bunmi Sherifat, Nichols, Peter David, and Malau-Aduli, Aduli Enoch Othniel (2019) Fatty acid profiles of muscle, liver, heart and kidney of Australian prime lambs fed different polyunsaturated fatty acids enriched pellets in a feedlot system. Scientific Reports, 9. 1238.

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Abstract

We investigated the effect of various dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) sources on the fatty acid profiles of muscle, liver, heart and kidney of Australian prime lambs. Seventy-two White Suffolk x Corriedale first-cross lambs weaned at 6 months of age were randomly allocated to the following six treatments: (1) Control: Lucerne hay only; wheat-based pellets infused with 50 ml/kg dry matter (DM) of oil from (2) rice bran (RBO); (3) canola (CO); (4) rumen-protected (RPO), (5) flaxseed (FSO) and (6) safflower (SO) sources in a completely randomized experimental design. Lambs in CO, FSO, SO and RPO treatments achieved contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 22:5n-3) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in the longissimus dorsi muscle ranging from 31.1 to 57.1 mg/135 g, over and above the 30 mg per standard serve (135 g) threshold for “source” claim under the Australian guidelines. There was no difference in n-3 LC-PUFA contents in longissimus dorsi muscle of lambs fed dietary oils of plant origin. The highest 18:3n-3 (ALA) contents achieved with FSO diet in the muscle, liver and heart were 45.6, 128.1 and 51.3 mg/100 g, respectively. Liver and kidney contained high contents of n-3 LC-PUFA (ranging from 306.7 to 598.2 mg/100 g and 134.0 to 300.4 mg/100 g, respectively), with all values readily exceeding the ‘good source’ status (60 mg per serve under Australian guidelines). The liver and kidney of PUFA fed lambs can be labelled as ‘good source’ of n-3 LC-PUFA based on EPA and DHA contents stipulated by the Food Standards of Australia and New Zealand guidelines. Therefore, if lamb consumers consider eating the liver and kidney as their dietary protein sources, they can adequately obtain the associated health benefits of n-3 LC-PUFA.

Item ID: 56664
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Copyright Information: Copyright © The Author(s) 2019
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Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2019 01:16
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0702 Animal Production > 070204 Animal Nutrition @ 100%
SEO Codes: 83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8303 Livestock Raising > 830310 Sheep - Meat @ 100%
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