Electrochemical surface engineering of magnesium metal by plasma electrolytic oxidation and calcium phosphate deposition: biocompatibility and in vitro degradation studies

Kannan, M. Bobby, Walter, R., Yamamoto, A., Khakbaz, H., and Blawert, C. (2018) Electrochemical surface engineering of magnesium metal by plasma electrolytic oxidation and calcium phosphate deposition: biocompatibility and in vitro degradation studies. RSC Advances, 8 (51). pp. 29189-29200.

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Abstract

In this study, the surface of magnesium metal was electrochemically engineered for enhanced biocompatibility and controlled degradation in body fluid. Firstly, a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating was formed on magnesium, followed by electrochemical deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) using an unconventional electrolyte. Cytocompatibility tests using L929 cells revealed that the PEO-CaP coating significantly improved the biocompatibility of magnesium. In vitro electrochemical degradation experiments in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that the PEO-CaP coating improved the degradation resistance of magnesium significantly. The corrosion current density (i(corr)) of the PEO-CaP coated magnesium was approximate to 99% and approximate to 97% lower than that of bare magnesium and the PEO-only coated magnesium, respectively. Similarly, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results showed that the polarisation resistance (R-P) of the PEO-CaP coated magnesium was one-order of magnitude higher as compared to the PEO-only coated magnesium and two-orders of magnitude higher than the bare magnesium, after 72 h immersion in SBF. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis revealed no localized degradation in the PEO-CaP coated magnesium. The study demonstrated that the PEO-CaP coating is a promising combination for enhancing the biocompatibility and reducing the degradation of magnesium for potential biodegradable implant applications.

Item ID: 55831
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2046-2069
Copyright Information: © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2018. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence.
Funders: National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)
Projects and Grants: NIMS MANA-NIMS Fellowship, JSPS KAKENHI (Grant number 2628215)
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2018 09:25
FoR Codes: 09 ENGINEERING > 0903 Biomedical Engineering > 090301 Biomaterials @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 53
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