Work settings of the first seven cohorts of James Cook University Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery graduates: meeting a social accountability mandate through contribution to the public sector and Indigenous health services

Woolley, Torres, Sen Gupta, Tarun, and Larkins, Sarah (2018) Work settings of the first seven cohorts of James Cook University Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery graduates: meeting a social accountability mandate through contribution to the public sector and Indigenous health services. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 26 (4). pp. 258-264.

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Abstract

Objective: The James Cook University medical school's mission is to produce a workforce appropriate for the health needs of northern Australia.

Design, setting and participants: James Cook University medical graduate data were obtained via cross-sectional survey of 180 early-career James Cook University medical graduates from 2005-2011 (response rate of 180/298 contactable graduates = 60%). Australian medical practitioner data for 2005-2009 graduates were obtained via the 2015 'Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life' wave 8 dataset.

Main outcome measure: Comparison of the range of work settings and hours worked by James Cook University medical graduates to Australian medical graduates.

Results: Compared to a similar group of Australian medical graduates, James Cook University Bachelor o f Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery graduates are significantly more likely to work in government- funded 'public' organisations (hospitals, community health centres, Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, government departments, agencies or defence forces). In particular, James Cook University medical graduates were more likely to work in Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services and community health centres and other state-run primary health care organisations than other Australian medical graduates.

Conclusion: James Cook University medical graduates appear to work in a higher proportion of public settings; in particular, primary care settings, than Australian medical graduates. This is an appropriate mix for the predominantly rural and remote geography of Queensland and its associated medical workforce priorities. Reporting medical graduate outcomes by their nature of practice could be an important adjunct to other measures, such as geographic location and choice of specialty.

Item ID: 55287
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1440-1584
Keywords: health workforce, medical education, practice, private, public, social accountability
Copyright Information: Copyright © 2018 National Rural Health Alliance Ltd.
Date Deposited: 05 Sep 2018 07:43
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified @ 20%
13 EDUCATION > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified @ 30%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920205 Health Education and Promotion @ 50%
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