Defining the osteoarthritis patient: back to the future

Dobson, G.P., Letson, H.L., Grant, A., McEwen, P., Hazratwala, K., Wilkinson, M., and Morris, J.L. (2018) Defining the osteoarthritis patient: back to the future. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, 26 (8). pp. 1003-1007.

[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted author version) - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (203kB) | Preview
[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2018.04.0...
 
10
137


Abstract

The history of osteoarthritis (OA) is important because it can help broaden our perspective on past and present controversies. The naming of OA, beginning with Heberden's nodes, is itself a fascinating story. According to Albert Hoffa, R. Llewellyn Jones and Archibald Edward Garrod, the name OA was introduced in the mid-nineteenth century by surgeon Richard von Volkmann who distinguished it from rheumatoid arthritis and gout. Others preferred the terms ‘chronical rheumatism’, ‘senile arthritis’, ‘hypertrophic arthritis’ or ‘arthritis deformans’. A similar narrative applies to the concept of OA affecting the whole joint vs the ‘wear-and-tear’ hypothesis, inflammation and the role of the central nervous system (CNS). In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Garrods (father and son) and Hermann Senator argued that OA was a whole joint disease, and that inflammation played a major role in its progression. Garrod Jnr and John Spender also linked OA to a neurogenic lesion ‘outside the joint’. The remaining twentieth century was no less dynamic, with major advances in basic science, diagnostics, treatments, surgical interventions and technologies. Today, OA is characterized as a multi-disease with inflammation, immune and CNS dysfunction playing central roles in whole joint damage, injury progression, pain and disability. In the current ‘omics’ era (genomics, proteomics and metabolomics), we owe a great debt to past physicians and surgeons who dared to think ‘outside-the-box’ to explain and treat OA. Over 130 years later, despite these developments, we still don't fully understand the underlying complexities of OA, and we still don't have a cure.

Item ID: 54547
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1063-4584
Keywords: osteoarthritis; history; inflammation; central nervous system; post-traumatic; pathophysiology
Date Deposited: 16 Jul 2018 05:11
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110322 Rheumatology and Arthritis @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110314 Orthopaedics @ 40%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences > 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified @ 10%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920116 Skeletal System and Disorders (incl. Arthritis) @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 137
Last 12 Months: 12
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page