Elevated prevalence of Helicobacter species and virulence factors in opisthorchiasis and associated hepatobiliary disease

Deenonpoe, Raksawan, Mairiang, Eimorn, Mairiang, Pisaln, Pairojkul, Chawalit, Chamgramol, Yaovalux, Rinaldi, Gabriel, Loukas, Alex, Brindley, Paul J., and Sripa, Banchob (2017) Elevated prevalence of Helicobacter species and virulence factors in opisthorchiasis and associated hepatobiliary disease. Scientific Reports, 7. 42744.

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Abstract

Recent reports suggest that Opisthorchis viverrini serves as a reservoir of Helicobacter and implicate Helicobacter in pathogenesis of opisthorchiasis-associated cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Here, 553 age-sex matched cases and controls, 293 and 260 positive and negative for liver fluke O. viverrini eggs, of residents in Northeastern Thailand were investigated for associations among infection with liver fluke, Helicobacter and hepatobiliary fibrosis. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was higher in O. viverrini-infected than uninfected participants. H. pylori bacterial load correlated positively with intensity of O. viverrini infection, and participants with opisthorchiasis exhibited higher frequency of virulent cagA-positive H. pylori than those free of fluke infection. Genotyping of cagA from feces of both infected and uninfected participants revealed that the AB genotype accounted for 78% and Western type 22%. Participants infected with O. viverrini exhibited higher prevalence of typical Western type (EPIYA ABC) and variant AB'C type (EPIYT B) CagA. Multivariate analyses among H. pylori virulence genes and severity of hepatobiliary disease revealed positive correlations between biliary periductal fibrosis during opisthorchiasis and CagA and CagA with CagA multimerization (CM) sequence-positive H. pylori. These findings support the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic opisthorchiasis and specifically to opisthorchiasis-associated CCA.

Item ID: 53981
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-2322
Additional Information:

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Funders: Commission on Higher Education, Thailand (CHE), Thailand Research Fund (TRF), National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), National Health Security Office, Thailand, Higher Education Research Promotion and National University Project of Thailand, Khon Kaen University (KKU), National Research Council, Thailand (NRC), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Tropical Medicine Research Centre (TMRC), National Cancer Institute (NCI), United States Army Medical Research and Material Command (USAMRMC)
Projects and Grants: CHE Strategic Scholarships for Frontier Research network for the Joint PhD Program Thai Doctoral Degree, TRF Senior Research Research Scholar RTA 5680006, NHMRC Principal Research Fellowship, CHE Health Cluster SHeP-GMS, KKU award number 156110, TMRC award number P50AI098639, NCI award number R01CA164719, USAMRMC contract number W81XWH-12-C-0267
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2018 00:07
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110307 Gastroenterology and Hepatology @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1108 Medical Microbiology > 110803 Medical Parasitology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920105 Digestive System Disorders @ 80%
92 HEALTH > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920404 Disease Distribution and Transmission (incl. Surveillance and Response) @ 20%
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