Recent Asian origin of chytrid fungi causing global amphibian declines

O’Hanlon, Simon J., Rieux, Adrien, Farrer, Rhys A., Rosa, Gonçalo M., Waldman, Bruce, Bataille, Arnaud, Kosch, Tiffany A., Murray, Kris, Brankovics, Balázs, Fumagalli, Matteo, Martin, Michael D., Wales, Nathan, Alvarado-Rybak, Mario, Bates, Kieran A., Berger, Lee, Böll, Susanne, Brookes, Lola, Clare, Frances, Courtois, Elodie A., Cunningham, Andrew, Doherty-Bone, Thomas M., Ghosh, Pria, Gower, David J., Hintz, William E., Höglund, Jacob, Jenkinson, Thomas S., Lin, Chun-Fu, Laurila, Anssi, Loyau, Adeline, Martel, An, Meurling, Sara, Miaud, Claude, Minting, Pete, Pasmans, Frank, Schmeller, Dirk S., Schmidt, Benedikt R., Shelton, Jennifer M.G., Skerratt, Lee F., Smith, Freya, Soto-Azat, Claudio, Spagnoletti, Matteo, Tessa, Giulia, Toledo, Luís Felipe, Valenzuela-Sánchez, Andrés, Verster, Ruhan, Vörös, Judit, Webb, Rebecca J., Wierzbicki, Claudia, Wombwell, Emma, Zamudio, Kelly R., Aanensen, David M., James, Timothy Y., Gilbert, M. Thomas P., Weldon, Ché, Bosch, Jaime, Balloux, François, Garner, Trenton, and Fisher, Matthew A. (2018) Recent Asian origin of chytrid fungi causing global amphibian declines. Science, 360 (6389). pp. 621-627.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://doi.org/10.1126/science.aar1965
60


Abstract

Globalized infectious diseases are causing species declines worldwide, but their source often remains elusive. We used whole-genome sequencing to solve the spatiotemporal origins of the most devastating panzootic to date, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a proximate driver of global amphibian declines. We traced the source of B. dendrobatidis to the Korean peninsula, where one lineage, BdASIA-1, exhibits the genetic hallmarks of an ancestral population that seeded the panzootic. We date the emergence of this pathogen to the early 20th century, coinciding with the global expansion of commercial trade in amphibians, and we show that intercontinental transmission is ongoing. Our findings point to East Asia as a geographic hotspot for B. dendrobatidis biodiversity and the original source of these lineages that now parasitize amphibians worldwide.

Item ID: 53624
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1095-9203
Funders: National Environmental Research Council (NERC), Microsoft Azure (MA), European Union (EU), Wellcome Trust (WT), Peoples Trust for Endangered Species, Morris Animal Foundation (MAF), Leverhulme Trust (LT), European Research Council (ERC), Australian Research Council (ARC)
Projects and Grants: NERC NE/K014455/1, MA subscription ID: ab7cd695-49cf-4a83-910a-ef71603e708b, EU BiodivERsA scheme, NERC NE/G002193/1, MAF D162Z0-022, ERC 260801–Big_Idea, WT grant 099202, ARC FT100100375, ARC DP120100811
Date Deposited: 14 May 2018 00:19
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070704 Veterinary Epidemiology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960499 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species not elsewhere classified @ 100%
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page