Mediating and moderating effects of work–home interference upon farm stresses and psychological distress

McShane, Connar Jo, and Quirk, Frances (2009) Mediating and moderating effects of work–home interference upon farm stresses and psychological distress. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 17 (5). pp. 244-250.

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Abstract

Objective: This study investigated whether work–home (WHI) or home–work interference (HWI) explained or affected the strength of the relationship between farmers' stresses and reported psychological distress.

Design: Distribution of questionnaire package; included Work–Home Conflict Scale, Farm Stress Survey, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Participants recruited via advertising in newsletters and newspapers, and distribution through businesses and meetings.

Participants: The majority of farmers (N = 51, male = 45, female = 5) were recruited from the one district. Farmers were individuals who identified their occupation as a farm owner, farm manager, or farm hand.

Main outcome measures: It was predicted farmers would report higher levels of WHI than HWI; time, a determinant of interference, would mediate the relationship between farmers' stresses and psychological distress; WHI and HWI would moderate farmers’ stresses and their psychological distress; overall reported level of psychological distress would be in normal to mild range because of positive general economic conditions.

Results: Farmers reported significantly higher levels of WHI than HWI (M = 3.21, M = 2.76, P < 0.001 respectively). WHI and time-based WHI mediated farmers’ stresses and psychological distress, particularly anxiety. WHI, time and strain, determinants of WHI mediated personal finances and subcomponents of psychological distress (stress, anxiety, depression). Time-based HWI mediated personal finances and stress. No moderating effects were found for WHI (r = -0.02, P = 0.882) or HWI (r = 0.15, P = 0.306).

Conclusions: Farmers of this specific sample presented a unique work–home interface. Limitations include the small sample size, recruitment methods, and culturally irrelevant measures as well as only assessing workrelated stresses. Future research should aim to develop measures appropriate for farmers of Australia.

Item ID: 5351
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1440-1584
Keywords: farmers, mediating, moderating, stress, work–home interface
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2009 23:09
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 50%
17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920506 Rural Health @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920504 Occupational Health @ 50%
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