An electrochemical sensing platform based on liquid-liquid microinterface arrays formed in laser-ablated glass membranes

Alvarez de Eulate, Eva, Strutwolf, Jörg, Liu, Yang, O'Donnell, Kane, and Arrigan, Damien W.M. (2016) An electrochemical sensing platform based on liquid-liquid microinterface arrays formed in laser-ablated glass membranes. Analytical Chemistry, 88 (5). pp. 2596-2604.

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Abstract

Arrays of microscale interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (μITIES) were formed using glass membranes perforated with microscale pores by laser ablation. Square arrays of 100 micropores in 130 μm thick borosilicate glass coverslips were functionalized with trichloro(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)silane on one side, to render the surface hydrophobic and support the formation of aqueous-organic liquid-liquid microinterfaces. The pores show a conical shape, with larger radii at the laser entry side (26.5 μm) than at the laser exit side (11.5 μm). The modified surfaces were characterized by contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The organic phase was placed on the hydrophobic side of the membrane, enabling the array of μITIES to be located at either the wider or narrower pore mouth. The electrochemical behavior of the μITIES arrays were investigated by tetrapropylammonium ion transfer across water-1,6-dichlorohexane interfaces together with finite element computational simulations. The data suggest that the smallest microinterfaces (formed on the laser exit side) were located at the mouth of the pore in hemispherical geometry, while the larger microinterfaces (formed on the laser entry side) were flatter in shape but exhibited more instability due to the significant roughness of the glass around the pore mouths. The glass membrane-supported μITIES arrays presented here provide a new platform for chemical and biochemical sensing systems.

Item ID: 53217
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1520-6882
Funders: Australian Research Council (ARC)
Projects and Grants: ARC LE120100026, ARC DP130102040
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2018 00:25
FoR Codes: 03 CHEMICAL SCIENCES > 0301 Analytical Chemistry > 030102 Electroanalytical Chemistry @ 50%
03 CHEMICAL SCIENCES > 0306 Physical Chemistry (incl Structural) > 030604 Electrochemistry @ 50%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970103 Expanding Knowledge in the Chemical Sciences @ 100%
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