A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Bird, Christopher S., Veríssimo, Ana, Magozzi, Sarah, Abrantes, Kátya G., Aguilar, Alex, Al-Reasi, Hassan, Barnett, Adam, Bethea, Dana M., Biais, Gérard, Borrell, Asuncion, Bouchoucha, Marc, Boyle, Mariah, Brooks, Edward J., Brunnschweiler, Juerg, Bustamante, Paco, Carlisle, Aaron, Catarino, Diana, Caut, Stéphane, Cherel, Yves, Chouvelon, Tiphaine, Churchill, Diana, Ciancio, Javier, Claes, Julien, Colaco, Ana, Courtney, Dean L., Cresson, Pierre, Daly, Ryan, de Necker, Leigh, Endo, Tetsuya, Figueiredo, Ivone, Frisch, Ashley J., Holst Hansen, Joan, Heithaus, Michael, Hussey, Nigel E., Litembu, Johannes, Juanes, Francis, Kinney, Michael J., Kiszka, Jeremy J., Klarian, Sebastian A., Kopp, Dorothée, Leaf, Robert, Li, Yunkai, Lorrain, Anne, Madigan, Daniel J., Maljkovic, Aleksandra, Malpica-Cruz, Luis, Matich, Philip, Meekan, Mark G., Ménard, Frédéric, Menezes, Gui M., Munroe, Samantha E.M., Newman, Michael C., Papastamatiou, Yannis P., Pethybridge, Heidi, Plumlee, Jeffrey D., Polo-Silva, Carlos, Quaeck-Davies, Katie, Raoult, Vincent, Reum, Jonathan, Torres-Rojas, Yassir Eden, Shiffman, David S., Shipley, Oliver N., Speed, Conrad W., Staudinger, Michelle D., Teffer, Amy K., Tilley, Alexander, Valls, Maria, Vaudo, Jeremy J., Wai, Tak-Cheung, Wells, R J David, Wyatt, Alex S.J., Yool, Andrew, and Trueman, Clive N. (2018) A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks. Ecology and Evolution, 2. pp. 299-305.

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Abstract

Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits in trophic interactions between sharks found in different habitats. We show that populations of shelf-dwelling sharks derive a substantial proportion of their carbon from regional pelagic sources, but contain individuals that forage within additional isotopically diverse local food webs, such as those supported by terrestrial plant sources, benthic production and macrophytes. In contrast, oceanic sharks seem to use carbon derived from between 30° and 50° of latitude. Global-scale compilations of stable isotope data combined with biogeochemical modelling generate hypotheses regarding animal behaviours that can be tested with other methodological approaches.

Item ID: 53109
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 2045-7758
Funders: University of Southampton, Natural Environment Research Council (NERC)
Projects and Grants: NERC NE/L50161X/1, NERC LSMSF EK267-03/16
Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2018 23:37
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060299 Ecology not elsewhere classified @ 40%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060202 Community Ecology (excl Invasive Species Ecology) @ 30%
05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0501 Ecological Applications > 050102 Ecosystem Function @ 30%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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