Does being indigenous make it complex general surgery?

Goonawarrdena, Janindu, Gunnarsson, Ronny, and de Costa, Alan (2015) Does being indigenous make it complex general surgery? In: [Presented at the General Surgeons Australia Annual Scientific Meeting]. From: General Surgeons Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, 17-19 September 2015, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

Purpose: Evaluate if being indigenous increases the overall risk of conversion (CONV) from a laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy. No previous study evaluating risk of CONV has analysed an indigenous population.

Methodology: In a cross sectional observational study, data was collected from any patient who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy at the Cairns Hospital between 2010-2012. Risk factors relating to patient factors, radiological factors and laboratory factors were considered. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression with the construction of nomograms was performed (accepted in Am J Surg 2015)

Results: Of 732 patients, 197 (26.9%) were indigenous. This study has the largest indigenous cohort to date. 40 preoperative risk factors were evaluated. The difference in CONV rate between patients who are indigenous (11%) and non-indigenous (4.7%) was statistically significant (P = 0.0033). However, ethnicity did not remain in the final multivariate model as a direct predictor of risk of CONV

Conclusion: Patients who are indigenous had a significantly higher CONV rate compared to patients who are non-indigenous. This was better explained by an increased prevalence of other risk factors and adding as a risk factor does not increase the overall risk of CONV. The nomogram developed to predict CONV can be applied to any patient regardless of their ethnicity.

Item ID: 52772
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
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Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2018 01:54
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110323 Surgery @ 70%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111701 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health @ 30%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920105 Digestive System Disorders @ 100%
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