Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface

Taetz, Stephan, John, Timm, Broecker, Michael, Spandler, Carl, and Stracke, Andreas (2018) Fast intraslab fluid-flow events linked to pulses of high pore fluid pressure at the subducted plate interface. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 482. pp. 33-43.

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Abstract

A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its chemical-mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge about how fluids flow within and out of descending slabs. Relicts of fluid-flow systems in exhumed rocks of fossil subduction zones allow for identification of the general relationships between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events; all of which are required for quantitative models for fluid-induced subduction zone processes. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished in an eclogite-facies m lange block from the Pouebo Eclogite M lange, New Caledonia. These veins record synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins), and infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) with the associated formation of a reaction selvage. The dehydration and fluid migration documented by the type I veins likely occurred on a timescale of 10(5)-10(6) years, based on average subduction rates and metamorphic conditions required for mineral dehydration and fluid flow. The timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock of the type II veins is quantified using a continuous bulk-rock Li-diffusion profile perpendicular to a vein and its metasomatic selvage. Differences in Li concentration between the internal and external fluid reservoirs resulted in a distinct diffusion profile (decreasing Li concentration and increasing delta Li-7) as the reaction front propagated into the host rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that the timescales of fluid-rock interaction associated with type II vein formation are on the order of 1 to 4 months (0.150(-0.08)(+0.14) years). The shortlived, pulse-like character of this process is consistent with the notion that fluid flow caused by oceanic crust dehydration at the blueschist-to-eclogite transition contributes to or even dominates episodic pore fluid pressure increases at the plate interface, which in turn, may trigger slip events reported from many subduction zones.

Item ID: 52620
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1385-013X
Keywords: Li chronometry, subduction zones, fluid flow system, diffusion modelling, plate interface, seismic slip
Funders: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Projects and Grants: DFG JO 349/5-1
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2018 07:31
FoR Codes: 04 EARTH SCIENCES > 0403 Geology > 040304 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences @ 100%
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