Risk factors for small pharyngeal airway dimensions in preorthodontic children: a three-dimensional study

Anandarajah, Seerone, Dudhia, Raahib, Sandham, Andrew, and Sonneson, Liselotte (2017) Risk factors for small pharyngeal airway dimensions in preorthodontic children: a three-dimensional study. Angle Orthodontist, 87 (1). pp. 138-146.

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Abstract

Objective: To analyze which parameters, gathered from standard orthodontic diagnostic material, were most relevant for identifying small pharyngeal airway dimensions in preorthodontic children.

Materials and Methods: The sample was composed of 105 cone beam computed tomography scans of healthy preorthodontic children (44 boys, 61 girls; mean age, 10.7 ± 2.4 years). Airway volume and minimal cross-sectional area were three-dimensionally assessed. Cephalometric features and skeletal maturity were assessed on generated two-dimensional cephalograms. Associations were analyzed and adjusted for age, gender, and skeletal maturity by multiple regression analyses.

Results: Airway volume and minimal cross-sectional area were significantly smaller in prepubertal children (P < .001, P < .05, respectively) and positively associated with age (P < .001, P < .01, respectively). After adjustment of age, skeletal maturity and gender significant associations were found between pharyngeal airway dimensions and craniofacial morphology. Airway volume was positively associated with maxillary and mandibular width (P < .01; P < .001, respectively) and anterior face height (P < .05; P < .05, respectively). Minimal cross-sectional area was positively associated with maxillary and mandibular width (P < .01; P < .001, respectively) and negatively associated with sagittal jaw relationship (AnPg, P < .05). Mandibular width and age were the most relevant factors for airway volume (r2 = 0.36). Mandibular width and sagittal jaw relationship were the most relevant factors for minimal cross-sectional area (r2 = 0.16).

Conclusion: Pharyngeal airway dimensions were significantly associated with age, skeletal maturity, and craniofacial morphology in all three planes. Children with a reduced mandibular width and increased sagittal jaw relationship are particularly at risk of having small pharyngeal airway dimensions.

Item ID: 51465
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1945-7103
Keywords: pharyngeal airway, children
Date Deposited: 13 Nov 2017 00:20
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1105 Dentistry > 110506 Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1105 Dentistry > 110507 Paedodontics @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920113 Oro-Dental Disorders @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health @ 50%
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