Book Review of "Blinded by Science: the social implications of epigenetics and neuroscience" by D. Wastell and S. White. Bristol, UK, Policy Press, 2017. ISBN 978-14473-2234-4.

Ainsworth, Frank (2017) Book Review of "Blinded by Science: the social implications of epigenetics and neuroscience" by D. Wastell and S. White. Bristol, UK, Policy Press, 2017. ISBN 978-14473-2234-4. Children Australia, 42 (3). pp. 222-223.

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Abstract

[Extract] Part one of the book consists of three chapters and is titled 'Getting to grips with the thought styles'. The first chapter 'Biology and the drive for human improvement' reviews recent developments in the biological sciences, and how these are now being linked, somewhat problematically, to earlier efforts to improve the human condition. 'How knowledge gets made in neuroscience and molecular biology' is the next chapter. Here, the authors lay out what they say are particular forms of reasoning and thought that are used by physical scientists. Their conclusion is that these thought forms lead to questionable conclusions about efforts to improve the human condition and invite the pursuit of 'a utopia free from misery, disorder and disease' (p. 3). These conclusions are not value free.

Item ID: 51462
Item Type: Article (Commentary)
ISSN: 2049-7776
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2017 03:38
FoR Codes: 16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1607 Social Work > 160799 Social Work not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9401 Community Service (excl. Work) > 940105 Childrens/Youth Services and Childcare @ 100%
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