Seasonal variation in Trypanosoma evansi vectors in northern Australia

Van Hennekeler, K., Skerratt, L.F., Jones, R.E., Spratt, D.M., and Fitzpatrick, L. (2006) Seasonal variation in Trypanosoma evansi vectors in northern Australia. In: Proceedings of the 11th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics. From: ISVEE 11: 11th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, 6-11 August 2011, Cairns, QLD, Australia.

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Abstract

The protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma evansi is transmitted mechanically between animals by tabanid flies (Family: Tabanidae). T. evansi causes the disease Surra, which produces significant mortality and production losses in a variety of mammals in endemic countries. Surra is an exotic disease and considered a high quarantine risk to Australia (AFFA, 2003), with Cape York regarded as a likely route of incursion. Thirty-four species of Tabanidae, including 14 species of Tabanus, were captured at 11 locations on Cape York and at Townsville, suggesting that appropriate species for Surra transmission are present in northern Australia. Trapping of tabanids in the Cape York region has allowed their distribution, trap-catch abundance and seasonal patterns to be analysed. These data have clarified the seasonal dynamics of different tabanid species. Further analysis of abundance and distribution in relation to weather and vegetation type could lead to prediction of the temporal and spatial abundance patterns of tabanids. This, in turn, would allow prediction of when and where the corresponding risk of vector transmission of Surra is potentially highest, in the event of an incursion. This information would be a valuable contribution to a risk map for incursion and establishment of Surra in the Cape York region, and would support the direction of surveillance and containment efforts.

Item ID: 51278
Item Type: Conference Item (Refereed Research Paper - E1)
ISSN: 1177-360X
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2017 01:36
FoR Codes: 07 AGRICULTURAL AND VETERINARY SCIENCES > 0707 Veterinary Sciences > 070704 Veterinary Epidemiology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9604 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species > 960405 Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species at Regional or Larger Scales @ 100%
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