Alcohol consumption in a general antenatal population and child neurodevelopment at 2 years

Halliday, Jane L., Muggli, Evelyne, Lewis, Sharon, Elliott, Elizabeth J., Amor, David J., O'Leary, Colleen, Donath, Susan, Forster, Dell, Nagle, Cate, Craig, Jeffrey M., and Anderson, Peter J. (2017) Alcohol consumption in a general antenatal population and child neurodevelopment at 2 years. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 71 (10). pp. 990-998.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2017-2091...
 
2


Abstract

Background: Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is a community health problem with up to 50% of pregnant women drinking alcohol. The relationship between low or sporadic binge PAE and adverse child outcomes is not clear. This study examines the association between PAE in the general antenatal population and child neurodevelopment at 2 years, accounting for relevant contributing factors.

Methods: This prospective population-based cohort recruited 1570 pregnant women, providing sociodemographic, psychological and lifestyle information and alcohol use for five time periods. PAE categories were ‘low’, ‘moderate/high’, ‘binge’, in trimester 1 or throughout pregnancy. Measures of cognitive, language and motor development (Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development) were available for 554 children, while measures of sensory processing (Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile) and social–emotional development (Brief Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment) were available for 948.

Results: A positive association in univariate analysis with low-level PAE throughout pregnancy and cognition (β=4.1, 95% CI −0.02 to 8.22, p=0.05) was attenuated by adjusting for environmental/social deprivation risk factors (β=3.06 (−1.19 to 7.30), p=0.16). Early binge drinking, plus continued PAE at lower levels, was associated with the child being more likely to score low in sensation avoidance (adjusted OR 1.88 (1.03 to 3.41), p=0.04).

Conclusion: Early binge exposure, followed by lower-level PAE, demonstrated an increase in sensation-avoiding behaviour. There were, however, no significant associations between PAE and neurodevelopment following adjustment for important confounders and modifiers. Follow-up is paramount to investigate subtle or later onset problems.

Item ID: 51212
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1470-2738
Funders: National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC)., Victorian State Government (VSG)
Projects and Grants: NHMRC grant no. 1011070, NHMRC senior research fellowship 1081288, NHMRC senior reserach fellowship 1021252, NHMRC practitioner fellowship 1021480, VSG Operational Infrastructure Support Scheme
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2017 22:57
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1110 Nursing > 111006 Midwifery @ 50%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine > 111499 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health @ 50%
92 HEALTH > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920507 Womens Health @ 50%
Downloads: Total: 2
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page