Keeping on Country: understanding and responding to crime and recidivism in remote Indigenous communities

Dawes, Glenn, Davidson, Andrea, Walden, Edward, and Isaacs, Sarah (2017) Keeping on Country: understanding and responding to crime and recidivism in remote Indigenous communities. Australian Psychologist, 52 (4). pp. 306-315.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ap.12296
 
2
4


Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this qualitative study were to examine local perspectives on the causes of crime and recidivism in two remote Indigenous communities, and provide a series of recommendations regarding more effective responses that could be implemented by way of justice reinvestment.

Method: This study was coordinated by a multi-disciplinary research team that actively engaged the community in every stage of the research process, through a culturally and ecologically informed participatory action research design. Data was gathered through semi-structured individual and focus group interviews with three cohorts: (a) offenders who had been incarcerated on at least one occasion (n = 20); (b) offenders' families (n = 20); and, (c) service providers working with offenders (n = 20). Data was also gathered through over 40 informal conversations. Data collection occurred over a period of 18 months, with participants recruited by Indigenous researchers and community members.

Data Analysis: Interviews were transcribed and analysed by NVivo qualitative data processing software in the first instance. The core research team and community members reviewed this analysis in order to collectively identify major themes and patterns in the perspectives of participants.

Conclusion: People in remote Indigenous communities are aware of the complex issues associated with crime in their community and have clear ideas regarding what can be done. We argue that in order to understand and address Indigenous crime and over-representation in the criminal justice system, the perspective of Indigenous people must be elevated and communities empowered to identify and implement ecologically and culturally informed solutions that will work for them.

Item ID: 50736
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1742-9544
Keywords: Indigenous crime, Indigenous over-representation in the criminal justice system, Indigenous recidivism, Indigenous research paradigm, justice reinvestment, participatory action research, remote Indigenous communities
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2017 11:27
FoR Codes: 16 STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY > 1602 Criminology > 160201 Causes and Prevention of Crime @ 100%
SEO Codes: 94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9404 Justice and the Law > 940402 Crime Prevention @ 40%
94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9404 Justice and the Law > 940403 Criminal Justice @ 40%
94 LAW, POLITICS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES > 9404 Justice and the Law > 940408 Rehabilitation and Correctional Services @ 20%
Downloads: Total: 4
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page