Conservation physiology and the quest for a 'good' Anthropocene

Madliger, Christine L., Franklin, Craig E., Hultine, Kevin R., van Kleunen, Mark, Lennox, Robert J., Love, Oliver P., Rummer, Jodie L., and Cooke, Steven J. (2017) Conservation physiology and the quest for a 'good' Anthropocene. Conservation Physiology, 5 (1).

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Abstract

It has been proposed that we are now living in a new geological epoch known as the Anthropocene, which is specifically defined by the impacts that humans are having on the Earth's biological diversity and geology. Although the proposal of this term was borne out of an acknowledgement of the negative changes we are imparting on the globe (e.g. climate change, pollution, coastal erosion, species extinctions), there has recently been action amongst a variety of disciplines aimed at achieving a 'good Anthropocene' that strives to balance societal needs and the preservation of the natural world. Here, we outline ways that the discipline of conservation physiology can help to delineate a hopeful, progressive and productive path for conservation in the Anthropocene and, specifically, achieve that vision. We focus on four primary ways that conservation physiology can contribute, as follows: (i) building a proactive approach to conservation; (ii) encouraging a pragmatic perspective; (iii) establishing an appreciation for environmental resilience; and (iv) informing and engaging the public and political arenas. As a collection of passionate individuals combining theory, technological advances, public engagement and a dedication to achieving conservation success, conservation physiologists are poised to make meaningful contributions to the productive, motivational and positive way forward that is necessary to curb and reverse negative human impact on the environment.

Item ID: 50503
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: Anthropocene, evidence-based conservation, pragmatism, public outreach, resilience
Additional Information:

© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press and the Society for Experimental Biology. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/ by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

ISSN: 2051-1434
Funders: Canada Research Chairs Program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Australian Research Council (ARC), ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, German Research Foundation, French National Research Agency, Austrian Science Fund (ASF)
Projects and Grants: ARC PDE150101266
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2017 09:40
FoR Codes: 05 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES > 0502 Environmental Science and Management > 050202 Conservation and Biodiversity @ 50%
06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0606 Physiology > 060699 Physiology not elsewhere classified @ 50%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9605 Ecosystem Assessment and Management > 960599 Ecosystem Assessment and Management not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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