Combined lower limb revascularisation and supervised exercise training for patients with peripheral arterial disease: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Menȇses, Annelise L., Ritti-dias, Raphael M., Parmenter, Belinda, Golledge, Jonathan, and Askew, Christopher D. (2017) Combined lower limb revascularisation and supervised exercise training for patients with peripheral arterial disease: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Sports Medicine, 47 (5). pp. 987-1002.

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Abstract

Background: Both revascularisation and supervised exercise training improve functional outcomes and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, the value of combined therapy, where exercise therapy is delivered as an adjunct to revascularisation, is less clear.

Objective: To systematically review evidence on the efficacy of lower limb revascularisation combined with supervised exercise training in patients with PAD.

Methods: Parallel-group randomised controlled trials indexed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science were searched (up to Jan 2016). Outcome measures were pain-free and maximum walking distances, ankle-brachial index (ABI), leg blood flow and quality of life. Methodological quality was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale.

Result: Eight trials were included that enrolled a total of 726 patients (mean age 66 +/- 3 years, ABI 0.66 +/- 0.05). Combined therapy led to greater improvements in pain-free (mean difference [MD] range 38-408 m) and maximal walking distances (MD range 82-321 m) compared with revascularisation or supervised training alone. Combined therapy had no added effect on resting ABI over revascularisation (MD range -0.05 to 0.13), and had a significantly greater effect than supervised exercise training alone (MD range 0.13-0.31). Limited evidence (one to three trials) also suggested that combined therapy led to greater improvements in leg blood flow and physical domains of quality of life than supervised exercise training alone, and that improvements in leg blood flow, as well as the physical and mental domains of quality of life were not different to that achieved with revascularisation alone.

Conclusion: Current evidence suggests that PAD patients treated with combined therapy achieve greater functional benefits than those treated with revascularisation or supervised exercise training alone. Limited evidence also suggests that the effect of combined therapy on leg haemodynamics and quality of life may be superior to supervised exercise training alone, and similar to revascularisation alone.

Item ID: 50325
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1179-2035
Funders: Australian Government (AG), National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)
Projects and Grants: AG International Postgraduate Research Scholarship, NHMRC 1000967, NHMRC 1019921
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2017 07:53
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine and Haematology > 110201 Cardiology (incl Cardiovascular Diseases) @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases @ 100%
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