Culturally-informed case conceptualisation: developing a clinical psychology approach to treatment planning for non-Indigenous psychologists working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients

Kilcullen, Meegan, and Day, Andrew (2018) Culturally-informed case conceptualisation: developing a clinical psychology approach to treatment planning for non-Indigenous psychologists working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients. Clinical Psychologist, 22 (3). pp. 280-289.

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View at Publisher Website: https://doi.org/10.1111/cp.12141
 
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Abstract

Objective: In the context of the Australian Psychological Society’s formal apology and the increasing awareness of the need to develop interventions that improve the social and emotional wellbeing of clients who identify from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural backgrounds, this paper considers the clinical psychology case conceptualisation. The primary aim of any case conceptualisation is to inform intervention and, in the initial stages of treatment, is considered important in helping the psychologists to develop a stronger therapeutic relationship whilst also providing a reference point from which to evaluate treatment progress. In other words, it enables practitioners to develop a coherent set of explanatory inferences – based in theory – that describe and explain why the person has a particular problem at a particular time.

Method: The model draws together mainstream case formulation processes with culturally specific understandings of social and emotional health and wellbeing. A worked case example is used in this paper to illustrate how the non-Indigenous psychologist can integrate influence of the broader social and cultural context into the case conceptualisation to enhance culturally responsive practice.

Results: The proposed model provides the psychologist with an entry point for understanding an individual’s experience within a broader socio-historical-political context. The model may help the practitioner to identify areas in which he or she needs to develop their cultural intelligence.

Conclusions: Developing and enhancing culturally responsive practice is a practical way in which clinical psychologists can meaningfully participate in “active reconciliation” within a clinical psychology encounter.

Item ID: 49899
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: case conceptualization; case formulation; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing; cultural responsiveness; cross-cultural psychology
ISSN: 1742-9552
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2017 05:54
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9203 Indigenous Health > 920399 Indigenous Health not elsewhere classified @ 100%
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