Multitasking and ad enjoyment: does our perception of time's passage mediate the relationship between multitasking and ad enjoyment

Balaji, Shweta, and McLoughlin, Aoife (2017) Multitasking and ad enjoyment: does our perception of time's passage mediate the relationship between multitasking and ad enjoyment. In: [To be presented at the 1st Conference of the Timing Research Forum]. From: 1st Conference of the Timing Research Forum, 23-25 October 2017, Strasbourg, France. (In Press)

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Abstract

Previous research on the effects of multitasking on media content have found that content can become more positively evaluated when one is doing multiple tasks (Voorveld, 2011). Multitasking may be particularly likely to affect advertising because ads are often avoided by engaging in another task during exposure to the ad content (Speck & Elliott, 1997). When people multitask with media, ad messages are rarely the sole focus of attention. Chinchanachokchai et al. (2015) explored the relationship between multitasking and time perception as well as the relationship between multitasking and task enjoyment alongside ad evaluation. Their study found that the mediating role of the perception of time passing had a resulting positive effect on ad evaluation, and that positive evaluation was likely not due to limited capacity in the attention system. Rather, the feedback response to the ads appeared to be the feeling that time seemed to pass unexpectedly fast. This paper presents work which extends on Chinchanachokchai et al's project, again investigating the mediating effect of time perception on ad evaluation, this time using more generalizable, everyday tasks. Participants were tested on one computer screen which displayed between one and three tasks depending on condition. Tasks included Space Invaders gameplay, a reading comprehension task and television advertisement. Findings and implications are also discussed.

Item ID: 49672
Item Type: Conference Item (Poster)
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Date Deposited: 01 Aug 2017 02:06
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
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