Got the time? Examining the effect of technological advancement on temporal judgements

McLoughlin, Aoife (2011) Got the time? Examining the effect of technological advancement on temporal judgements. In: [Presented at the British Psychological Society Cognitive Section Annual Conference 2011]. From: British Psychological Society Cognitive Section Annual Conference 2011, 6-8 September 2011, Newcastle-under-Lyme, UK.

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Abstract

Previous research (Blatchley et al, 2007) investigating the relationship between timing accuracy and computer use, highlighted a potential difference between individuals with high and low levels of computer usage. In order to further examine this phenomenon two experiments were conducted examining the effect that everyday technology use may be having on the human internal timing system. It was hypothesised that individuals using more everyday technologies would exhibit changes in timing consistent with an accelerated internal clock. In Experiment 1 participants completed the purposely developed Everyday Technology Usage Questionnaire (ETUQ) assessing everyday technology use, along with a duration estimation task. In Experiment 2, participants completed the same questionnaire to assess their technology use and an interval production task. MANOVA analyses showed significant differences between individuals with high and low technology use, in both the estimation and production tasks. On average all participants overestimated in estimation tasks, and under-produced in production tasks. However, participants with higher technology use overestimated and under-produced to a greater degree, indicative of a clock speed affect. These findings suggest that the relationship between everyday use of technology and temporal experience warrants further study. Potential mechanisms underlying this relationship are currently being investigated.

Item ID: 49671
Item Type: Conference Item (Abstract / Summary)
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Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2017 01:36
FoR Codes: 17 PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES > 1701 Psychology > 170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance @ 100%
SEO Codes: 97 EXPANDING KNOWLEDGE > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences @ 100%
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