Prospective controlled cohort study of Troponin I levels in patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions: prone versus supine position

Macfarlane, A.I., Rudd, D., Knight, E., Marshman, L.A.G., Guazzo, E.P., and Anderson, D.S. (2017) Prospective controlled cohort study of Troponin I levels in patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative conditions: prone versus supine position. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience, 35. pp. 62-66.

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Abstract

Prior studies have suggested that elevated serum Troponin-I (TnI) levels immediately after non-cardiac surgical procedures (8–40%) represent subclinical cardiac stress which independently predicts increased 30-day mortality. Routine post-operative TnI monitoring has therefore been suggested as a standard of care. However, no prior studies have focussed on elective degenerative spine surgery, whilst few have measured pre-op TnI. Further, prolonged prone positioning could represent an additional, independent, cardiac stress. We planned a prospective controlled cohort study of consecutive TnI levels in routine elective spine surgery for degenerative spine conditions, incorporating 3 groups: ‘prone < 2 h’, ‘prone > 2 h’ and ‘supine’ positioning. TnI levels (>0.04 μg/L) were recorded immediately pre-/post-surgery, and by 24 h of surgery. N = 120 patients were recruited. Complete results were obtained in 92 (39 supine, 53 prone). No significant between-groups differences were observed in demographic or cardiovascular risk factors. Validated TnI-elevation by 24 h was not observed in any group. Spurious elevations were recorded in one ‘prone < 2 h’ and one ‘prone > 2 h’. One non-ST segment myocardial infarction (STEMI) occurred on day 7 without TnI elevation by 24 h (prone > 2 h). There was no 30-day mortality. Conclusions: Despite a lower cut-off, no validated TnI elevation was observed in any group by 24 h after surgery. One non-STEMI had not been associated with TnI-elevation by 24 h. Immediately peri-operative cardiac stress therefore appeared comparatively rare in patients undergoing routine elective spine surgery. Further, prone positioning did not represent an additional, independent, risk. Routine immediately post-operative TnI monitoring in elective spine surgery therefore appears unjustified. Our study highlighted several caveats regarding consecutive TnI testing.

Item ID: 49095
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1532-2653
Keywords: Troponin-I; spine surgery; prone
Research Data: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967586816302417
Date Deposited: 19 Jun 2017 00:59
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110323 Surgery @ 80%
11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110302 Clinical Chemistry (diagnostics) @ 20%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920118 Surgical Methods and Procedures @ 80%
92 HEALTH > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases @ 20%
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