Data on the fungal species consumed by mammal species in Australia

Nuske, S.J., Vernes, K., May, T.W., Claridge, A.W., Congdon, B.C., Krockenberger, A., and Abell, S.E. (2017) Data on the fungal species consumed by mammal species in Australia. Data in Brief, 12. pp. 251-260.

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Abstract

The data reported here support the manuscript Nuske et al. (2017). Searches were made for quantitative data on the occurrence of fungi within dietary studies of Australian mammal species. The original location reported in each study was used as the lowest grouping variable within the dataset. To standardise the data and compare dispersal events from populations of different mammal species that might overlap, data from locations were further pooled and averaged across sites if they occurred within 100 km of a random central point. Three locations in Australia contained data on several (>7) mycophagous mammals, all other locations had data on 1–3 mammal species. Within these three locations, the identity of the fungi species was compared between mammal species’ diets. A list of all fungi species found in Australian mammalian diets is also provide along with the original reference and fungal synonym names.

Item ID: 48793
Item Type: Article (Refereed Research - C1)
Keywords: mammal; diet; fungi; spore dispersal; mycophagy; mycorrhizal
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© 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY license.

This article is related to Nuske, S.J., Vernes, K., May, T.W., Claridge, A.W., Congdon, B.C., Krockenberger, A., and Abell, S.E. (2017) Redundancy among mammalian fungal dispersers and the importance of declining specialists. Fungal Ecology, 27. pp. 1-13. See Related URLs for access.

A version of this publication was included as Chapter 2 of the following PhD thesis: Nuske, Susan Joy (2017) The importance of declining mammalian fungal specialists for ectomycorrhizal fungal dispersal. PhD thesis, James Cook University, which is available Open Access in ResearchOnline@JCU. Please see the Related URLs for access.

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ISSN: 2352-3409
Funders: Australian Postgraduate Award (APA), Caring for our Country Program (CCP)
Projects and Grants: CCP AG14-00542
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2017 01:04
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0602 Ecology > 060208 Terrestrial Ecology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 96 ENVIRONMENT > 9608 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity > 960806 Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity @ 100%
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