Exploring patient support by breast care nurses and geographical residence as moderators of the unmet needs and self-efficacy of Australian women with breast cancer: results from a cross-sectional, nationwide survey

Ahern, Tracey, Gardner, Anne, and Courtney, Mary (2016) Exploring patient support by breast care nurses and geographical residence as moderators of the unmet needs and self-efficacy of Australian women with breast cancer: results from a cross-sectional, nationwide survey. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 23. pp. 72-80.

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Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated whether use of services of a breast care nurse (BCN) at any time during treatment for breast cancer led to reduced unmet needs and increased self-efficacy among women with breast cancer. A secondary aim was to analyse comparisons between urban and rural and remote dwellers.

Method: Participants were Australian women who completed treatment for breast cancer at least 6 months before the survey date, recruited through two national databases of women diagnosed with breast cancer. The cross-sectional online survey consisted of two well validated measures, the SCNS-SF34 and the CASE-Cancer Scale. Statistical data were analysed using SPSS, with chi-square used to measure statistical significance.

Results: A total of 902 participants responded to the survey. Unmet needs in the psychological domain were most prominent. Respondents who used the services of a BCN were significantly less likely to report unmet needs regarding tiredness, anxiety; future outlook; feelings about death and dying; patient care and support from medical staff; and provision of health systems and information. Scores of self-efficacy showed women using the services of a BCN had significantly higher self-efficacy when seeking and obtaining information (ρ ≤ 0.001) and understanding and participating in care (ρ = 0.032). Urban dwellers were more likely to have choice of health care service, but overall neither unmet needs nor perceived self-efficacy varied statistically significantly by remoteness.

Conclusions: Women with breast cancer experience a range of unmet needs; however those using BCN services demonstrated positive outcomes in terms of decreased unmet needs and increased self-efficacy.

Item ID: 47494
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1532-2122
Additional Information:

breast cancer, breast care nurse, psychological domain, unmet needs, self-efficacy, geographical comparisons, survey

Funders: Australian Postgraduate Award Scholarship
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2017 01:26
FoR Codes: 11 MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES > 1110 Nursing > 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified @ 100%
SEO Codes: 92 HEALTH > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920210 Nursing @ 100%
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