Collaboration, collision, and (re)conciliation: Indigenous participation in Australia's maritime industry — a case study from Point Pearce/Burgiyana, South Australia

Fowler, Madeline, and Rigney, Lester-Irabinna (2017) Collaboration, collision, and (re)conciliation: Indigenous participation in Australia's maritime industry — a case study from Point Pearce/Burgiyana, South Australia. In: Caporaso, Alicia, (ed.) Formation Processes of Maritime Archaeological Landscapes. When the Land Meets the Sea . Springer, Cham, Switzerland, pp. 53-77.

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Abstract

Understanding Indigenous peoples' formative role in early exploration and economic development of Australia throughout the contact and post-contact period is important. From first interactions with visiting mariners and shipwreck survivors, Indigenous peoples have been active agents within the maritime sphere. Evidence of Aboriginal maritime agency is also found in the archaeological literature of Aboriginal laboring in whaling, sealing, and pearling (McPhee 2001; Gibbs 2003; Paterson 2011). Another intersection between Aboriginal and maritime spheres occurred at coastal missions. The missionary period began in Australia in 1823 with the establishment of missions in New South Wales (McNiven and Russell 2005:226). Despite their isolating agendas missions were, in many cases, still engaged with the maritime domain. Indigenous peoples living on missions across Australia built, owned, operated, and maintained boats (Roberts et al. 2013). The purpose of working vessels varied and included cultural obligations, transport, and fishing for subsistence and sale. Importantly, Aboriginal missions used colonial maritime networks for importing supplies, exporting products, transporting stock and people internally, as well as relying on marine resources for subsistence (Fowler 2013:74).

Item ID: 47266
Item Type: Book Chapter (Research - B1)
ISBN: 978-3-319-48786-1
Date Deposited: 14 Feb 2017 03:11
FoR Codes: 21 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 2101 Archaeology > 210110 Maritime Archaeology @ 30%
21 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 2101 Archaeology > 210101 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Archaeology @ 60%
21 HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY > 2101 Archaeology > 210108 Historical Archaeology (incl Industrial Archaeology) @ 10%
SEO Codes: 95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9503 Heritage > 950302 Conserving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage @ 60%
95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9503 Heritage > 950304 Conserving Intangible Cultural Heritage @ 10%
95 CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING > 9503 Heritage > 950307 Conserving the Historic Environment @ 30%
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