What drives long distance commuting into Australian regions? A spatial panel model approach

Nicholas, Christopher, and Welters, Riccardo (2017) What drives long distance commuting into Australian regions? A spatial panel model approach. Journal of Rural Studies, 49. pp. 140-150.

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Abstract

Impacts of long distance commuting (LDC) on a host region have been a topic of research interest for some time. Recently, however, criticisms have surfaced about the validity of studies which address this topic. Specifically, temporal variability and spatial interaction have rarely been considered. This article argues that a single model which jointly incorporates these two aspects can improve the predictive power of LDC impacts. Using spatial panel modelling, 516 Local Government Areas (LGAs) across Australia over two census periods (2006 and 2011) were used to explore drivers of LDC. It was found that local labour market characteristics had minimal influence on recruitment strategies of firms that typically use LDC. Housing affordability does not impact on the decision of non-resident workers to either migrate into a region or adopt LDC into that region. However, local service provision and the availability of rental accommodation reduces the uptake of LDC. In addition, higher turnover of the resident population erodes social capital in host regions, which reduces the attractiveness of the local area and leads to increased use of LDC.

Item ID: 46599
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1873-1392
Keywords: long distance commuting; mining; Australia; regions; spatial analysis
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A version of this publication was included as Chapter 4 of the following PhD thesis: Nicholas, Christopher Roy (2018) Long distance commuting into Australian regions: its determinants and impacts on wellbeing in the region and social capital's capacity to mediate those impacts. PhD thesis, James Cook University, which is available Open Access in ResearchOnline@JCU. Please see the Related URLs for access.

Date Deposited: 09 Dec 2016 02:44
FoR Codes: 14 ECONOMICS > 1402 Applied Economics > 140218 Urban and Regional Economics @ 100%
SEO Codes: 91 ECONOMIC FRAMEWORK > 9102 Microeconomics > 910208 Micro Labour Market Issues @ 100%
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