Reproductive capacity of a marine species (Octopus tetricus) within a recent range extension area

Ramos, Jorge E., Pecl, Gretta T., Semmens, Jayson M., Strugnell, Jan M., León, Rafael I., and Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A. (2015) Reproductive capacity of a marine species (Octopus tetricus) within a recent range extension area. Marine and Freshwater Research, 66 (11). pp. 999-1008.

[img] PDF (Published Version) - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

View at Publisher Website: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/MF14126
 
11
2


Abstract

To persist in the face of environmental change, species must adjust to the new conditions or change their geographical distribution, e.g. by range extension. Success for individuals within a zone of range extension requires the new environment to support their capacity to produce viable gametes and survival of the offspring. Reproductive characteristics of the polewards range-shifting Octopus tetricus were examined within the new range off north-eastern Tasmania, Australia, to assess whether it is likely to successfully establish in this extended area of its range. Approximately 44% of captured males and 14% of captured females were mature. Mature females with developing eggs were found throughout the year. Greater numbers of mature females were observed during the austral summer and spring, whereas mature males were observed all year round. Fecundity was high and developing embryos appeared to be viable. Our results suggest that O. tetricus is successfully reproducing beyond its historical range, the reproductive cycle is timed to favourable environmental conditions, and the population has the potential to be self-sustainable. The reproductive biology of O. tetricus may thus facilitate the establishment and prevalence of the population into new environments beyond the known historical distribution.

Item ID: 46377
Item Type: Article (Research - C1)
ISSN: 1448-6059
Keywords: East Australian Current, fecundity, ocean warming, population dynamics, population establishment, range shift
Funders: Mexican Government, University of Tasmania (UTAS), Australian Research Council (ARC)
Projects and Grants: CONACYT scholarship 308672, UTAS Tasmania Graduate Research scholarship, Bookend Lynchpin Ocean Scholarship 2012, ARC Future Fellowship
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2016 07:45
FoR Codes: 06 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES > 0608 Zoology > 060808 Invertebrate Biology @ 100%
SEO Codes: 83 ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND ANIMAL PRIMARY PRODUCTS > 8302 Fisheries - Wild Caught > 830203 Wild Caught Edible Molluscs @ 100%
Downloads: Total: 2
More Statistics

Actions (Repository Staff Only)

Item Control Page Item Control Page